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I am trying to learn JavaScript. First day! I want to concatenate the First and Last names. This is what I have so far. It works fine, but if I don't enter one of the fields, it just shows up as null. How do I avoid that? Where would I put that clause in the following code? Thanks for your help in advance!

function ShowFullName()
{
    var varFirstName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_firstname").getValue();
    var varLastName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_lastname").getValue();
    Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_name").setValue(varFirstName + " "  + varLastName);
};
share|improve this question
4  
Part of learning JScript (or anything) will be learning to use the documentation. Of course, you're welcome to ask questions here, but be aware that you are expected to show research effort. – harpo Oct 24 '12 at 19:44
    
By the way, what library are you using? Or, is "JScript" actually not a spelling error? – Alexander Oct 24 '12 at 19:47
    
Any recommendations for a new person like me on where to start. I've been thrust into this world, and I'm reading online and trying to understand using JavaScript as best that I can. I need like a beginner's guide. Any suggestions? I currently am trying to use it within Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011. – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 20:07
    
@Lauren: Google "Douglas Crockford" and watch his lectures on YouTube. – slebetman Oct 24 '12 at 20:33
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can take advantage of the fact that all variables are truthy or falsy in JavaScript. In other words, every variable can be coerced (converted) into true or false.

null is falsy, and strings with content are truthy. That means:

var a = null;
var b = 'hello';

if (a) {
    // does not run
} else {
    // runs
}

if (b) {
    // runs
}

You can use other kinds of expressions too, like a ternary expression or the logical OR operator:

alert(a ? 'yes' : 'no'); // => no
alert(b ? 'yes' : 'no'); // => yes

alert(a || b); // => hello

In this case, logical OR is our most interesting choice. When you use the operator, the following happens:

  1. If the left side evaluates truthy, return that value.
  2. Otherwise, return the value that the right side evalutes to.

In the above example, a is null, so it is falsy. The expression returns the right side, the value of b. So we can take advantage of this behavior by writing varFirstName || '', which will either return the first name (if there is one), or if it's null, the right side gives us an empty string.

function ShowFullName() {
    var varFirstName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_firstname").getValue();
    var varLastName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_lastname").getValue();

    Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_name").setValue(((varFirstName || '') + " " + (varLastName || '')).trim());
}

I added a call to trim to remove extra spaces from the result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the great explanation! It makes good sense! – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 20:08

You can check if something is null like:

if (obj == null) { 
  // do this 

}

so something like

if (varFirstName == null) { varFirstname = "";}

This will set firstName to an empty string

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Darren, I added what you suggested right below my two var statements. I added this: if (varFirstName == null) { varFirstname = "";} if (varLastName == null) { varLastname = "";} – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 19:50
    
Sorry, i hit enter too fast. I typed in First Name, Lauren, and then it still says "null" so in my full name box it says Lauren Null......What am i doing wrong? – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 19:51
    
Is it returning Null as in capital letter N ? If so, then it looks like a string "Null" is being returned as a null object is spelt all lowercase. Use this instead: if (varLastName == null || varLastName == "Null") { varLastName = "";} - the || means 'Or' – Darren Oct 24 '12 at 19:57
    
You could also try checking for undefined. Use: if (varLastName is undefined){varLastName = "";} – Darren Oct 24 '12 at 20:02
    
Darren, thank you for youe help. I took Jeff's advice above and that worked just fine, and now I see you suggested the same thing. THank you so much for your help I really appreciate it. – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 20:02

try this:

function ShowFullName()
    var varFirstName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_firstname").getValue();
    var varLastName = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_lastname").getValue();

    if(varFirstName == null || varFirstName.ToLower() == "null") { 
        varFirstName = "";
    }

    if(varLastName == null || varLastName.ToLower() == "null") { 
        varLastName = "";
    }

    Xrm.Page.getAttribute("lauren_name").setValue(varFirstName + " "  + varLastName);
};
share|improve this answer
    
Jeff! Thank you so much for your help I really appreicate it. This worked great! Any recommendations for a new person like me on where to start. I've been thrust into this world, and I'm reading online and trying to understand as best that I can. I need like a beginner's guide. Any suggestions? – Lauren Oct 24 '12 at 20:01
    
Sorry @Lauren I don't know much about JScript, it just happened that i know Xrm.Page.getAttribute will provides direct access to the Xrm.Page.data.entity.attributes.get method. – Jeff Robert Dagala Oct 24 '12 at 20:09
    
Are the .ToLower() bits really necessary? If it's not null, could it become null after .ToLower()? (I know nothing about xrm, but I do know js...) – bfavaretto Oct 24 '12 at 21:00
    
yes it is necessary because it will return String 'Null'. and just to make it more safe, that is why I added .ToLower() – Jeff Robert Dagala Oct 24 '12 at 21:06
    
Obviously! I guess my eyes just ignored the quotes... – bfavaretto Oct 24 '12 at 21:11

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