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Here's my problem: I have to resolve various filenames/locations (data directory may have sub-directories) which are user-configurable. If I can resolve the filename completely prior to the loop the following script works:

[prompt] more test.sh
#! /usr/bin/env bash

newfile=actual-filename

for directory in `find -L ${FILE_PATH}/data -type d`; do
    for filename in `ls -1 ${directory}/${newfile} 2>/dev/null`; do
        if [[ -r ${filename} ]]; then
            echo "Found ${filename}"
        fi
    done
done

[prompt] ./test.sh
[prompt] Found ${SOME_PATH}/actual-filename

However, if newfile has any wildcarding in it the inner-loop will not run. Even if it only returns a single file.

I would use find with some regex, but to auto-generate the proper expressions and do the substitutions for somethings will be tricky (e.g. pgb.f0010{0930,1001}{00,06,12,18} would correlate to some files associate with Sep. 30 and Oct 1 of 2010 the first grouping is computed by my script for a provided date).

pgb.f0010093000 pgb.f0010093006 pgb.f0010093012 pgb.f0010093018 pgb.f0010100100
pgb.f0010100106 pgb.f0010100112 pgb.f0010100118 

I'm running Fedora 15 64-bit.

share|improve this question
3  
Note that for varname in $(ls -1 fileglob 2>/dev/null) is just a slightly-buggier way to write for varname in fileglob. (In your case: for filename in $directory/$newfile.) –  ruakh Oct 24 '12 at 20:39
1  
Someone once told me: You should never try to parse or iterate over the output of ls: mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs –  kbulgrien Oct 24 '12 at 20:39
    
I tried not to, but there isn't a regextype argument for find that is compatible with something like pgb.f0010{0930,1001}{00,06,12,18} which works fine in ls. –  NotNormal Oct 25 '12 at 14:22
    
Also checked: varname in fileglob does not actually get the files which match the pattern. –  NotNormal Oct 25 '12 at 15:13
    
Please list an actual example of filenames that are being matched to clarify what is being asked. –  kbulgrien Oct 25 '12 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The root problem is that there is a dependence on shell expansion in the broken script. Use eval:

#! /usr/bin/env bash
FILE_PATH="."
newfile=pgb.f0010{0930,1001}{00,06,12,18}

for directory in `find -L ${FILE_PATH}/data -type d`; do
    for filename in `eval ls -1 ${directory}/${newfile} 2>/dev/null`; do
        if [[ -r ${filename} ]]; then
            echo "Found ${filename}"
        fi
    done
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Trying to auto-generate the regex for something like {0930, 1001} in the script was more work than I wanted to do. –  NotNormal Oct 25 '12 at 17:44
    
Perhaps. The regex for the glob "{0930,1001}" seems no more difficult to compute than the glob itself. The regex is "(0930)|(1001)". The glob character "?" translates to ".", and "*" translates to ".*". –  kbulgrien Oct 25 '12 at 17:54
newfile="*"
find -L ${FILE_PATH}/data -name "${newfile}" \
| while read filename
  do
    if [[ -r ${filename} ]]; then
      echo "Found ${filename}"
    fi
  done

-or-

newfile="*"
find -L ${FILE_PATH}/data -name "${newfile}" -readable -exec echo "Found {}" \;

-or with regular expressions-

newfile='.*/pgb.f0010(0930|1001)(00|06|12|18)'
FILE_PATH=.
find -L ${FILE_PATH}/. -regextype posix-extended \
  -regex "${newfile}" -readable -exec echo "Found {}" \;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the second version. –  ruakh Oct 24 '12 at 20:37
    
Yes, find works for -name *, but find does not seem to be able to handle the example I gave above: -name pgb.f0010{0930,1001}{00,06,12,18} –  NotNormal Oct 25 '12 at 14:17
    
Then replace -name with -regex ? –  kbulgrien Oct 25 '12 at 15:34
    
I would like to support the glob options so novice *nix users can test using the ls command. –  NotNormal Oct 25 '12 at 15:45
    
Use of ls -1 pgb.f0010{0930,1001}{00,06,12,18} is novice? I have used *nix since before linux, and never used that notation before this question was asked. Not that I am a typical novice, but in this use perhaps, since I learned something from the question. –  kbulgrien Oct 25 '12 at 16:31

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