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I use SQL Server 2008 R2 as the database engine. With my MSDN subscription, I can get SQL Server 2012 for development use. Since I noticed some cool things in 2012 SSMS, my question is that if I only use 2012 SSMS and keep 2008 R2 as the database engine, will there be any difference in scripts' generation or any other effects?

Thanks.

UPDATE 1: Oh yes, I saw this page: SQL Server Database Engine Backward Compatibility, but it is not exactly what I am looking for.

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I am using SSMS 2012 for both SQL Server 2008 R2 and 2012 engines - works flawlessly. When creating scripts, you can always define what version of SQL Server those scripts are intended for - so just pick the "right" version. –  marc_s Oct 24 '12 at 20:33
    
@marc_s Thanks for the comment. I just wanted to be sure. –  Farhan Oct 24 '12 at 20:39
    
@marc_s BTW, your removal of sql-server tag has reduced the visibility of my question. Now instead of over 5000 people, less than 200. –  Farhan Oct 24 '12 at 20:40
    
Total 182 for "2008 R2", 89 for "2012" --> that's still a lot more than 200 ..... I think one should have focused sql-server-xxxx tags if only specific versions are really concerned.... –  marc_s Oct 24 '12 at 20:44
    
FWIW - SSMS 2012 works for SQL Server 2005 as well. –  Keith Oct 25 '12 at 14:25
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, there should be no ill effects.

SSMS 2012 should generate scripts that are compatible with the database version that is being actively used.

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I guess that would be correct. I just wanted to make sure that there aren't any hidden effects. –  Farhan Oct 25 '12 at 16:07
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