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Can some one help me? I'm not very strong with lambda expressions.

protected void Process1(List<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist)
    {
        if (!SomeClass.Validate(item)) 
        { 
            continue; 
        } 
        DoStuff(item); 
        DoMore(item); 
        DoEven(item);
    }
}

protected void Process2(List<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist)
    { 
        if (!SomeClass.Validate(item) || item.Value == 0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        DoStuff(item);
        DoMore(item);
        DoEven(item); 
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by JamieSee, bmargulies, Jon B, Jamie Keeling, BNL Oct 25 '12 at 15:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
You question might be a better fit for codereview.stackexchange.com –  dtb Oct 24 '12 at 20:32
    
What specifically are you trying to improve? –  Abe Miessler Oct 24 '12 at 20:32
    
Can you be more specific on "do stuff"? Generally speaking, lambdas shouldn't alter the collection they operate on. –  jtheis Oct 24 '12 at 20:33
    
possible duplicate of LINQ equivalent of foreach for IEnumerable<T> –  JamieSee Oct 24 '12 at 20:34
    
In general, this is a test and I'm trying to figure out how to do it right –  CyberDx Oct 24 '12 at 20:34

6 Answers 6

Second process is the same as calling first process with parameter

myList.Where(item => item.Value != 0)

Or, if you need both methods:

protected void Process1(IEnumerable<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist)
    { 
        if (!SomeClass.Validate(item))        
            continue;

        DoStuff(item);
        DoMore(item);
        DoEven(item); 
    }
}

protected void Process2(IEnumerable<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    Process1(myList.Where(item => item.Value != 0));
}

Also, I'd changed input parameter to IEnumerable (because you only iterating through sequence of items).

share|improve this answer
protected void Process1(List<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist.Where(item => SomeClass.Validate(item))
    {
        DoStuff(item); 
        DoMore(item); 
        DoEven(item);
    }
}

protected void Process2(List<SomeClass> mylist)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist.Where(item => item.Value != 0 && SomeClass.Validate(item))
    { 
        DoStuff(item);
        DoMore(item);
        DoEven(item); 
    }
}

That's how I would get it done.

share|improve this answer

You mean something like this?

protected void Process(List<SomeClass> mylist, List<Action<SomeClass>> actions)
{
    foreach (var item in mylist)
    {
        if (!SomeClass.Validate(item)) 
        { 
            continue; 
        }
        foreach(var action in actions) 
            action(item); 
    }
}

then call it with:

Process(list, new List<Action<SomeClass>> {DoStuff, DoMore, DoEven});
share|improve this answer

One thing you can do is to use Linq to apply the validation to the collection and just return valid items. Additionally, you can chain them together to apply multiple validations, if needed. For instance:

return myList.Where(item -> !SomeClass.Validate(item))
             .Where(item -> !OtherClass.Validate(item))

This would return a collection of just the items that pass validation, to which you could apply whatever "stuff" you need to "do".

share|improve this answer

The Process method can be made very generic and reusable:

void Process<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, Predicate<T> filter, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
        if (filter(item))
            action(item);
}

Then you will use it, for example, like this:

Process(
    list, 
    i => SomeClass.Validate(i) && i.Value != 0, 
    i => 
    {
        DoStuff(i);
        DoMore(i);
        DoEven(i);
    });
share|improve this answer

I'm not a big fan of passing lists around to begin with, but...

protected void Process1(List<SomeClass> myList)
{
    myList.Where(item => SomeClass.Validate(item)).ToList()
        .ForEach(item =>
        {
            DoStuff(item);
            DoMore(item);
            DoEven(item);
        });
}

protected void Process2(List<SomeClass> myList)
{
    myList.Where(item => SomeClass.Validate(item) && item.Value != 0).ToList()
        .ForEach(item =>
        {
            DoStuff(item);
            DoMore(item);
            DoEven(item);
        });
}
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 IEnumerable<T> has no extension method ForEach –  L.B Oct 24 '12 at 20:48
    
You are correct, sir. Forgot the ToList(). –  Cole Cameron Oct 24 '12 at 20:57
    
@L.B - It is List not just an IEnumerable and it has ForEach extension method. Please remove your down votes. –  Tariqulazam Oct 24 '12 at 20:59
    
Now do you think it is better then a simple if? –  L.B Oct 24 '12 at 20:59
    
@Tariqulazam When you apply where to List, you don't have ForEach anymore. Try to compile new List<int>().Where(x=>x>0).ForEach(i => { int x = 1; }); before commenting –  L.B Oct 24 '12 at 21:01

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