Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to get the IPs of all the destination devices where my data transfer using rsync could not be complete (or even start) as those devices are not connected to Internet or got disconnected while data transfer ...


My actual problem scenario is :

rsync -t Desktop/sony.pdf home@a.b.c.d: ssh: connect to host a.b.c.d port 22: No route to host

and I want the list of all such IPs where the data transfer could not be complted ...

the list of all IPs like 'a.b.c.d '

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I do the job in perl (in command line):

# perl -ne '
    ($conn{$2}->{"ip"},$conn{$2}->{"started"})=($3,$1) if 
        /^(.{15}).*rsyncd\[(\d+)\]:\sconnect.*\((\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\)/;
    $conn{$2}->{"closed"}=$1 if /(.{15}).*rsyncd\[(\d+)\]:\ssent\s.*\stotal/;
    END {
        print "Good:\n";
        map{
            printf "%s %-16s %s\n",
                $conn{$_}->{"started"},$conn{$_}->{"ip"},$conn{$_}->{"closed"} if
                    $conn{$_}->{"closed"};
          } sort { $conn{$a}->{"started"} cmp $conn{$b}->{"started"}
          } keys %conn;
        print "Unterminated:\n";
        map{
            printf "%s %s\n",$conn{$_}->{"started"},$conn{$_}->{"ip"};
          } sort { $conn{$a}->{"started"} cmp $conn{$b}->{"started"}
          } grep { ! defined $conn{$_}->{"closed"}
          } keys %conn;
    }' < /var/log/daemon.log

This could produce outputs like:

Good:
Apr 28 08:12:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 08:15:35
Apr 28 08:27:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 08:28:04
Apr 28 08:42:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 08:42:13
Apr 28 08:57:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 08:57:16
Apr 28 09:12:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 09:12:28
Apr 28 09:27:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 09:27:13
Apr 28 09:42:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 09:42:09
Apr 28 09:57:02 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 09:57:16
Apr 28 10:12:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 10:12:32
Apr 28 10:27:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 10:27:12
Apr 28 10:42:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 10:42:14
Apr 28 10:57:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 10:57:13
Apr 28 11:27:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 11:28:01
Apr 28 11:42:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 11:44:32
Apr 28 11:57:02 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 11:58:43
Apr 28 12:12:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 12:12:27
Apr 28 12:27:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 12:28:48
Apr 28 12:42:01 127.0.0.1        Apr 28 12:42:13
Apr 28 12:57:01 192.168.1.36     Apr 28 12:57:56
Unterminated:
Apr 28 11:12:01 127.0.0.1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. but i am not having any file inside as deamon.log inside /var/log !! –  user1709815 Oct 25 '12 at 6:40

You can say where the log file is (per the man page documentation):

--log-file=FILE         override the "log file" setting
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Better than my answer. –  Joseph Quinsey Oct 24 '12 at 21:28
    
What Linux distribution have you tested that? I get -> rsync: --log-file=/root/.rsyncd.log: unknown option –  Proverbio Dec 27 '13 at 5:32
    
The feature was added in rsync version 2.6.9 (6 Nov 2006). You can see the change log at: rsync.samba.org/ftp/rsync/src/rsync-2.6.9-NEWS As the change is so old, I would think that most any distribution that is up to date would have this feature. I used Mandriva Enterprise Server which is based on a 2009 release of their free version. –  kbulgrien Jan 2 '14 at 14:26
    
remember to use double dash --log-file –  remo Jul 19 '14 at 21:35

Search for evidence of rsync in the system logs. For example:

sudo grep -ir rsync /var/log

For that matter, you could grep / though that is overkill.

share|improve this answer

Logs infos are normaly sent via syslog daemon, when rsync run in daemon mode.

If you want to log someting when using rsync over ssh, you have to put option in command line:

rsync --rsync-path='/usr/bin/rsync --log-file=$HOME/.rsyncd.log' -t Desktop/sony.pdf home@a.b.c.d:

for saving logs in destination host or

rsync --log-file=$HOME/.rsyncd.log -t Desktop/sony.pdf home@a.b.c.d:

for saving logs in source host.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.