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Why doesn't var foo = foo throw a ReferenceError?

Note: foo = foo does throw a ReferenceError.

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foo = typeof foo does not :) –  Mike Samuel Oct 24 '12 at 20:57
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you declare

var foo = ...

you declare the variable for the entire scope (that is your function if not global), not just the code afterwards, contrary to other languages.

So in the right part of the assignment, foo is already declared, even if it is still undefined. There is no reference error.

Note that this property of var declaration in javascript can be a source of error. Because you might very well have (in more complex) this kind of code :

if (true) {
    var a = 3; // do you think this is "local" ?
}
var a;
alert(a); // a is 3, did you expect it ?
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Presumably, variable declarations are hoisted in Javascript. Which means the code

function bar() {
    // some other code
    var foo = foo;
}

is equivalent to:

function bar() {
    var foo;
    // some other code
    foo = foo;
}

In fact, even the following works:

function bar() {
    return foo;
    var foo;
}

(And returns undefined.)

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Yep. With var the declaration is hoisted though the initialization is not, while with function declarations, both are hoisted. This causes problems with things like try { throw null; } catch (e) { var e = 3; } alert(e); –  Mike Samuel Oct 24 '12 at 20:56
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JavaScript sorts var declaration to top, so at assignment time it is already declared (even if undefined):

var foo;
foo = foo;
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When you use var keyword

var foo = foo

JavaScript hoisting creates foo and assigns it undefined value before code executes. So you can assign it any value which is foo here and foo itself is undefined so in fact you are again assigning undefined to foo through the same variable

When you are doing

foo = foo

you don't have left side foo defined earlier to assign a value to it.

When you are doing

var foo = bar

you don't have bar defined earlier.

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