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I'm writing a compiler, and I have working code for handling infinitely nested if statements, but it's kind of a hack. I don't know if it's safe to do this?

con_statement:
IF exp DO
{
  $1 = ifNum++;
  if($2 == BOOLEAN_TYPE || $2 == INTEGER_TYPE)
    {
      utstring_printf(code, "\tpop\teax\n");
      utstring_printf(code, "\tcmp\teax, 0\n");
      utstring_printf(code, "\tje\tIF_END_%d\n", $1);
    }
  if($2 == FLOAT_TYPE)
    {
      utstring_printf(code, "\tnop\n");
    }
}
program FI
{
  utstring_printf(code, "IF_END_%d:\n", $1);
}
;
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What are you concerned about? The label generation? The code generation? The program part of the rule? It isn't clear how you handle ELSE clauses...maybe that doesn't matter, but it often does. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '12 at 21:46
    
Saying $1 = LABELNUM and typing a terminal seems like a bad kludge to me? Sorry I forgot to finish typing, –  SetSlapShot Oct 24 '12 at 21:47
1  
Since the default action is to set $$ = $1;, dinking with $1 like that might have ramifications upstream, but it shouldn't affect the Yacc code — just any of your actions that looks at the value returned by con_statement. I think it would be more conventional to create a mechanism to associate a label number with the current construct. I think what you're doing is aconventional. It think it may have ramifications for you later. But I don't think it breaks Yacc itself. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '12 at 22:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This works fine but it would be IMO clearer to use $$/$4:

con_statement:
IF exp DO
{
  $$ = ifNum++;
  if($2 == BOOLEAN_TYPE || $2 == INTEGER_TYPE)
    {
      utstring_printf(code, "\tpop\teax\n");
      utstring_printf(code, "\tcmp\teax, 0\n");
      utstring_printf(code, "\tje\tIF_END_%d\n", $$);
    }
  if($2 == FLOAT_TYPE)
    {
      utstring_printf(code, "\tnop\n");
    }
}
program FI
{
  utstring_printf(code, "IF_END_%d:\n", $4);
}
;

The first action is generating a value (which it puts into $$), and then later actions can access that value.

Alternately (and particularly if you want to support ELSE), it may make sense to split this initial action onto a separate production:

con_statement:
  if_head program FI
    { utstring_printf(code, "IF_FALSE_%d:\n", $1); }
| if_head program ELSE
    { utstring_printf(code, "\tjmp\tIF_END_%d\n", $1);
      utstring_printf(code, "IF_FALSE_%d:\n", $1); }
  program FI
    { utstring_printf(code, "IF_END_%d:\n", $1); }
;

if_head:
  IF exp DO
    { $$ = ifNum++;
          :
;

This allows using the same action for plain if and if/else, avoiding a grammar conflict, since at the point you are parsing the IF..DO you don't know whether there will be an ELSE or not.

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