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I'm looking for a way to style a div that has no ID or class association. I'm not looking for comments suggesting that I apply an ID or a class to the div's myself as the code I'm looking to modify is part of a wordpress plugin, which when updated would reset any styles I apply.

The code that I'm trying to modify is:

<div class="gallery_detail_box">
    <div><?php echo $post->post_title; ?></div>
    <div><?php echo the_excerpt_max_charlength(100); ?></div>
    <a href="<?php echo $permalink; echo basename( get_permalink( $post->ID ) ); ?>"><?php echo $gllr_options["read_more_link_text"]; ?></a>
</div>

I have tried targeting the div containing "post_title" as I want to make that bold and have tried several different ways but to no avail, my last attempt at targeting that div was:

.gallery_detail_box > #div {
    font-weight:bold;
}

.gallery_detail_box #div #div {
    font-weight:normal;
}

Where am I going wrong?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To target each of the child DIVs Try this:

div.gallery_detail_box div:nth-child(1) {....}
div.gallery_detail_box div:nth-child(2) {....}

Good Luck.

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This works a treat, thanks –  lil_bugga Oct 24 '12 at 21:57
    
You're welcome. Happy to help. –  Bryan Allo Oct 24 '12 at 21:58

# is used when referencing IDs. A div is not an ID but a tag.

Try

.gallery_detail_box div {
   font-weight: bold;
 }
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I've tried this and just tried it again, but it makes the contents of the "gallery_detail_box div" & "gallery_detail_box div div" bold :( –  lil_bugga Oct 24 '12 at 21:54

Take out the # sign. When targeting a type selector you just use the selector name without any prefix.

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the # doesn't seem to make a difference either way –  lil_bugga Oct 24 '12 at 21:55
    
The second CSS block is probably overriding the first one (because it says that all divs get normal font). Try them one at a time by commenting the other one out. –  Peter Gluck Oct 24 '12 at 22:04
    
I've already accepted an answer, but just went back and tried that anyway, commenting the second style just apllied Bold to both div's –  lil_bugga Oct 24 '12 at 22:17
    
That is what I would expect from the first block. –  Peter Gluck Oct 24 '12 at 22:27

Depending on what browser you are using this may or may not work. It will not work in older versions of IE(7,8), or any other browsers that don't support CSS 3.

.gallery_detail_box {
    font-weight:normal;
}

.gallery_detail_box div:nth-child(1){
    font-weight:bold;
}

For older browser

.gallery_detail_box {
    font-weight:normal;
}

.gallery_detail_box div:first-child{
    font-weight:bold;
}

To then apply custom styles to the second, third, etc nested div in the older browsers you would do:

.gallery_detail_box div:first-child + div{
    font-weight:bold;
}
/*(second)*/
.gallery_detail_box div:first-child + div + div{
    font-weight:bold;
}
/*(third)*/

etc.

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I've accepted Bryan Allo's answer which was to use '.gallery_detail_box div:nth-child(1)'. Having read your reply I wondered what is the best way to code so that this would work in both browsers with and without CSS 3 support. I know that if you use the same elemtents twice as part of 2 different styles the last elements (those nearest the bottom of the page) will be applied so would I put the old browsers code first then the CSS 3 complient version? –  lil_bugga Oct 24 '12 at 22:08
    
I would probably create two separate stylesheets - one for modern browsers and one for IE 7/8. I would wrap the stylesheet link for IE 7/8 in IE 8 conditional comments, and put the CSS 3 compliant version first. <!--[if lte IE 8]> That way the CSS 3 compliant version will be loaded for all pages, and IE 7/8 will overload it with whatever you've linked in the conditional comments –  Abraham P Oct 24 '12 at 22:14

Easiest way to do this will be with a first-child psuedoselector.

.gallery_detail_box div:first-child {
    font-weight: bold;
}

This has ramifications for older browsers. Check the MDN compatibility chart to see if any of your target browsers are affected: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/:first-child

If you need to target child elements beyond the first, you can use the :nth-child(2) psuedoselector.

The other option would be to use JavaScript, which would work reliably in, well, any browser with JavaScript support.

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Give your div a class. Its poor browser optimization to do:

.class div{}

Because the browser does a reverse search through the dom when adding css to elements.

https://developers.google.com/speed/docs/best-practices/rendering

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