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I'm not sure it's even possible, but my command line usecase goes something like this:

  1. do svn update

  2. do a svn log -l {how many times since my last commit - 1}

  3. do a `svn diff -rHEAD:{my last commit revision + 1}

and try to get an overview of what happened since last time I touched the code. I get a lot of valuable information from this, and would like everybody in my team to get the same feeling of control and overview of the code base.

Not everyone in my team is comfortable with the command line but like the hudson interface.

So; is there a way to the the commit diff since last build (we do a build per commit) in the individual build page?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think your best option would be to use the support in Hudson for linking subversion commits with a 3rd party subversion repository viewer such as ViewVC or Trac. Each entry on the recent changes list will then have a link to the repository browser for the appropriate revision where you can see the diff.

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Yeah, thanks. I just figured it out moments before reading your post. I added a link to the viewsvn server and voila! Behind each modified file on the 'changes' list, a small 'diff' link appeared. Subtle, very subtle. –  Steen Aug 20 '09 at 17:42

Well I don't know if it is what you need and perhaps my answer is naive, but you can redirect the output of your "commit diff" in a specific file and access it frow the "workspace" link in the specific build page.

The next step would be to modify pages generated by hudson to give a more direct access to this file, with eventually color highlight. But I do not know hudson this deep.

My 2 cents

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