Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an SQLite table called match that has two columns: column1 and column2 that contain integer values:

column1   column2
------------------

5          6
6          8
8          9
90         91
1          20
10         20

I want to match duplicate numbers found in either columns and join them, including the matches second value, so that my search result returns would be:

5, 6, 8, 9 
1, 20, 10

(notice that 90 and 91 have no matches and therefore are not included).

My 'guess' at making this is:

SELECT column1, column2 
FROM match 
WHERE column2 
IN (SELECT column1 
    FROM match 
    GROUP BY column1 HAVING (COUNT(column1) > 0)) 
    UNION 
    SELECT column1, column2 
    FROM match 
    WHERE column1 
    IN (SELECT column2 
        FROM match 
        GROUP BY column1 HAVING (COUNT(column2) > 0)) 
        UNION 
        SELECT column1, column2 
        FROM match 
        WHERE column1 
        IN (SELECT column1
            FROM match 
            GROUP BY column1 HAVING (COUNT(column1) > 1)) 
            UNION 
            SELECT column1, column2 
            FROM match 
            WHERE column2 
            IN (SELECT column2 
                FROM match 
                GROUP BY column2 HAVING (COUNT(column2) > 1)) 

and the result is almost what I need:

5 6
6 8
8 9
1 20
10 20

But what I really need is to have the result grouped somehow. For example:

(5, 6, 8, 9) (1, 10, 20)

Is this possible? And is my SQL attempt over-complicated?

share|improve this question
    
Is there any maximum to how many matches you can find? I don't really think this kind of logic should be done at the database layer. –  Kevin DiTraglia Oct 24 '12 at 22:16
    
If your rule is that there are matches, why are 1,5,9,and 10 getting into your desired results? –  invertedSpear Oct 24 '12 at 22:43
    
Oh, I get it now, you want the whole record if either number has a match. –  invertedSpear Oct 24 '12 at 22:56
    
Yes, and also grouped. I should mention that I have basic knowledge of SQL and ideally whatever the SQLite database returns would be a collection of these that I can Step through, i.e. first record returned: "5, 6, 8, 9", second record returned: "1, 10, 20". –  Ian Clay Oct 24 '12 at 23:30
add comment

1 Answer

I think this is what you want: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!7/05747/9

SELECT column1 as newColumn
FROM match WHERE column1 in (

SELECT myColumn
FROM(

SELECT count(*) as cnt, myColumn
FROM (
SELECT column1 as myColumn
FROM match
UNION ALL
SELECT column2 as myColumn
FROM match
 ) x
GROUP BY myColumn
HAVING cnt > 1
  ) y
) OR column2 in (
SELECT myColumn
FROM(

SELECT count(*) as cnt, myColumn
FROM (
SELECT column1 as myColumn
FROM match
UNION ALL
SELECT column2 as myColumn
FROM match
 ) x
GROUP BY myColumn
HAVING cnt > 1
  ) y
)
UNION
SELECT column2 as newColumn
FROM match WHERE column1 in (

SELECT myColumn
FROM(

SELECT count(*) as cnt, myColumn
FROM (
SELECT column1 as myColumn
FROM match
UNION ALL
SELECT column2 as myColumn
FROM match
 ) x
GROUP BY myColumn
HAVING cnt > 1
  ) y
) OR column2 in (
SELECT myColumn
FROM(

SELECT count(*) as cnt, myColumn
FROM (
SELECT column1 as myColumn
FROM match
UNION ALL
SELECT column2 as myColumn
FROM match
 ) x
GROUP BY myColumn
HAVING cnt > 1
  ) y
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is useful but I would like to make my question a bit clearer: (5, 6, 8, 9) are a group (or a set) because they have something in common in that they have digits common in either column1 or column2. (1, 10, 20) are also a group (or set) as they also have common digits in either column1 or column2. My aim is to group search results based on this rule. –  Ian Clay Oct 24 '12 at 23:23
    
I'm not sure if you can logically do that with the data as presented. I don't know what your table design actually is, but I'm now wondering if this problem might be cracked by first examining how you are storing data and determining if some changes there might make this more feasible. Or like KDiTraglia said, maybe the database layer is not the right place to be tackling this. –  invertedSpear Oct 25 '12 at 0:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.