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I have validation attributes on the properties in my model. If I pass the model to the view the validation works fine. However, when that model is a property of a View Model and the controller passes the View Model to the view, the unobtrusive validation no longer works and it doesn't get validated on the controller. The model binding to the controller works just fine on post either way.

If one can bind hidden fields and such using dot notation for objects in a view model why doesnt unobtrusive validation also work, does anyone have advice on how to get this to work?

View Model (the first class below is what the view uses, "Required" or not on its first property doesn't make a difference)

public class PlanStakeholderViewModel : PlanGoalSelectorViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public PlanStakeholder PlanStakeholder { get; set; }
}
public class PlanGoalSelectorViewModel
{
    public IList<PlanGoal> AvailableGoals { get; set; }
    public IList<PlanGoal> SelectedGoals { get; set; }
    public PostedGoals PostedGoals { get; set; }
}

public class PostedGoals
{
    public string[] GoalIDs { get; set; }
}

VIEW

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)
    @Html.Hidden("PlanStakeholder.PlanID")
    @Html.Hidden("PlanStakeholder.Id")

    @Html.Partial("_Form")  

    <div class="editor-label"></div>
    <div class="editor-field">
        <input type="submit" value="Save" /> | @Html.ActionLink("Back to Plan", "Index", "Plan")
    </div>
}

VIEW _Form

@model Navigator.Views.ViewModels.PlanStakeholderViewModel

<div class="editor-label" style="vertical-align:top">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Name)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Name)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Name)
</div>

<div class="editor-label" style="vertical-align:top">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Relationship)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Relationship)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.PlanStakeholder.Relationship)
</div>

<div class="editor-label" style="vertical-align:top">
     <label>Associated Goals</label>
</div>
<div class="editor-field checkbox">
@Html.CheckBoxListFor(x => x.PostedGoals.GoalIDs,
                      x => x.AvailableGoals,          
                      x => x.Id,               
                      x => x.ShortTitle,               
                      x => x.SelectedGoals,
                      Position.Vertical)
</div>

MODEL

public class PlanStakeholder : Base
{
    public PlanStakeholder()
    {
        PlanID = -1;
        Relationship = String.Empty;
        Name = String.Empty;
    }

    [Required]
    public int PlanID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50, ErrorMessage = "The {0} cannot be more than {1} characters.")]
    public string Relationship { get; set; }

    [Required]
    [MaxLength(50, ErrorMessage = "The {0} cannot be more than {1} characters.")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

UPDATE 1 Below is the output of the form html for the Relationship property.

<input class="text-box single-line" data-val="true" data-val-required="The Relationship field is required." id="PlanStakeholder_Relationship" name="PlanStakeholder.Relationship" type="text" value="Mom" />

Below is the controller actions

[AuthorizeRoles(RoleSite.None, RoleOrg.OrgMember, RoleCohort.Client)]
public ActionResult Edit(int id, int planId)
{
    var plan = PlanManager.GetSingle(CurrentUser.UserId, CurrentOrg.Id);

    var model = new PlanStakeholderViewModel();
    model.PlanStakeholder = PlanStakeholderManager.GetSingle(id, CurrentUser.UserId);
    model.AvailableGoals = PlanGoalManager.GetList(plan.Id, CurrentUser.UserId);
    model.SelectedGoals = PlanGoalManager.GetRelatedToStakeholder(id, CurrentUser.UserId);

    if (model.Item.Id != id)
    {
        return HttpNotFound();
    }

    return View(model);
}

[HttpPost, ActionName("Edit")]
[AuthorizeRoles(RoleSite.None, RoleOrg.OrgMember, RoleCohort.Client)]
public ActionResult EditConfirmed(PlanStakeholderViewModel model)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        ///DO STUFF
        return RedirectToAction("Index", "Plan");
    }
    return View(model);
}

UPDATE 2 If I comment out the CheckBoxListFor in the view then everything works fine. Looks like I need to take this question/issue elsewhere. When not commented out, if I enter a value for PlanStakeholder.Name that is longer than whats allowed by the model I get "Value cannot be null. Parameter name: source" as my asp.net error on the line that has the @Html.CheckBoxListFor.

share|improve this question
    
Wait.. What? Bind using dot notation? What do you mean by that? Your Hidden fields in the view are.. strange to say the least. –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 25 '12 at 5:38
    
What I mean is for those two values in the hidden fields to be posted back to the controller and have its relevant model properties set you can use a '.' to make that happen automatically and in turn ModelState.IsValid will be true. Except in this case, while those values do get set the validation never happens on client or server side. –  Marc Oct 25 '12 at 16:36
    
I've never heard of this being supported. It may work, but I doubt this is something that you can count on. Just use a normal @Html.HiddenFor. Why do you want to do it this way? –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 25 '12 at 17:10
    
However, I think your real problem is that you have defined PlanID as an int, which is non-nullable. Because int is a value type, it must always have a value (if you don't set it, it's default value is 0), so it will never fail validation. –  Erik Funkenbusch Oct 25 '12 at 17:12
    
Ignore the hidden fields for now, they are not the issue here. The issue is model.PlanStakeholder.Name and model.PlanStakeholder.Relationship not being validated on server or client side. FYI - the model has a constructor for two id's to set them to -1. –  Marc Oct 25 '12 at 19:41

1 Answer 1

This is one reason I tend not to use Partial views. They have way too many gotchas, and you have to know various details.

I vastly prefer EditorTemplates. They handle collections correctly and generate the proper names of nested properties. And, they deal with the FormContext issue.

But... in any event. Add this to the top of your partial view.

@{ ViewContext.FormContext = new FormContext(); }
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't help, also, making the view non partial doesn't help either, its the same problem either way. –  Marc Oct 25 '12 at 5:10

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