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Consider the following code:

template <typename T>
class C2 {
     public: 
             T method() { }
             int method2() { }
};

Compiling it with g++ -Wall -c -pedantic gives me the following warning:

test.cpp: In member function ‘int C2<T>::method2()’: test.cpp:4:29: warning: no return statement in function returning non-void [-Wreturn-type]

Which is expected. The strange thing is that method() isn't returning anything either. Why doesn't that generate a warning, since instantiating C2 with T = int makes calls to both methods equally dangerous?

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1  
Are you instantiating C2 somewhere when compiling? –  Pubby Oct 24 '12 at 23:11
    
Works here. –  Jesse Good Oct 24 '12 at 23:12
    
Did you actually call "method"? The compiler does not generate code for template functions that are not exercised. –  Craig Wright Oct 24 '12 at 23:16
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you say T = void, then no return statement is needed.

Just because you can use your template in a way that's broken doesn't mean you have to, and the com­piler may be giving you the benefit of the doubt.

Also remember that member functions of a class template are only instantiated if and when used. So the way to actually cause an error is to have C2<char> x; x.method();, and that does indeed produce a warning.

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Makes sense: the compiler can't say it does or does not return void if it's not instantiated. Also, only instantiating the template doesn't give a warning, but calling the method indeed does, just as you said. Thanks for the explanation. –  Gabriel Oct 24 '12 at 23:22
    
I'd like to point out that the function isn't generated even if it doesn't have the template variable return type. So, if you don't call x.method2(), it won't generate the warning from the original question. (Just realized that myself) –  Xymostech Oct 24 '12 at 23:26
    
Hmm. Here, I use g++ 4.7.0, and it generates that warning for method2 even if I don't call it (the code I tested was exactly what I posted, with nothing added). –  Gabriel Oct 25 '12 at 11:41
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You actually have to call "method" in order for the compiler to compile it. It's a template function after all. See comment in code below.

template <typename T>
class C2 {
     public: 
             T method() { }
             int method2() { }
};

int main()
{
   C2<int> c;
   c.method2();
   // If you comment out the below line, there is no warning printed.
   c.method();
}
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