Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following matrix

2    4    1
6    32   1
4    2    1
5    3    2
4    2    2

I want to make the following two matrices based on 3rd column

first

2    4
6    32
4    2

second

5    3
4    2

Best I can come up with, but I get an error

x <- cbind(mat[,1], mat[,2]) if mat[,3]=1

y <- cbind(mat[,1], mat[,2]) if mat[,3]=2

share|improve this question
2  
Please post reproducible examples in the future. You'll get better responses that way. –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 25 '12 at 0:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have a matrix A, this will get the first two columns when the third column is 1:

A[A[,3] == 1,c(1,2)]

You can use this to obtain matrices for any value in the third column.

Explanation: A[,3] == 1 returns a vector of booleans, where the i-th position is TRUE if A[i,3] is 1. This vector of booleans can be used to index into a matrix to extract the rows we want.

Disclaimer: I have very little experience with R, this is the MATLAB-ish way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Just what I needed. Thank you for the explanation. –  Steve Hwang Oct 25 '12 at 0:54

If mat is your matrix:

mat <- matrix(1:15,ncol=3)
mat[,3] <- c(1,1,1,2,2)
> mat
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    6    1
[2,]    2    7    1
[3,]    3    8    1
[4,]    4    9    2
[5,]    5   10    2

Then you can use split:

> lapply( split( mat[,1:2], mat[,3] ), matrix, ncol=2)
$`1`
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    6
[2,]    2    7
[3,]    3    8

$`2`
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    4    9
[2,]    5   10

The lapply of matrix is necessary because split drops the attributes that make a vector a matrix, so you need to add them back in.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I never use split, but everytime I see it I think I ought to start. –  Brandon Bertelsen Oct 25 '12 at 1:37
    
@BrandonBertelsen Thanks. I've started using split and stack pretty regularly--they complement each other nicely. –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 25 '12 at 1:39
    
@AriB.Friedman - see my answer above using by which I think will retain names and dimensions. –  thelatemail Oct 25 '12 at 2:17

Yet another example:

#test data
mat <- matrix(1:15,ncol=3)
mat[,3] <- c(1,1,1,2,2)

#make a list storing a matrix for each id as components
result <- lapply(by(mat,mat[,3],identity),as.matrix)

Final product:

> result
$`1`
  V1 V2 V3
1  1  6  1
2  2  7  1
3  3  8  1

$`2`
  V1 V2 V3
4  4  9  2
5  5 10  2
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great answer, as it doesn't drop the dimensions, unlike split. –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 28 '12 at 23:08

This is a functional version of pedrosorio's idea:

 getthird <- function(mat, idx) mat[mat[,3]==idx, 1:2]
 sapply(unique(mat[,3]), getthird, mat=mat)  #idx gets sent the unique values
#-----------
[[1]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    6
[2,]    2    7
[3,]    3    8

[[2]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    4    9
[2,]    5   10
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.