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public class A<E> extend AbstractList<E>{

private SLNode<E> Head = new SLNode<E>
private int length = 0;     // length of the list

 // I will skip the class of SLNode<E>
 // Head's element and successor is initialized as null in the class SLNode<E>

     public void add(int index, E element)  // insert an element in the list 
     {
         // if index is less than 0 or greater than the length
          if( (index < 0) || (index > length ) )
               throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();

          if(index ==0)
          {
              SLNode<E> newnode = new SLNode<E>(element, null);  // make new node
              newnode.setSuccessor(Head.getSuccessor());  
              Head.setSuccessor( newnode);
              length++;
          }
       }

Q1. Is this right way of adding element at the front of the list? (using dummy header node, but no tail) Q2. Would it be the same whether the list is empty or non-empty?

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1  
is this your general insert method or insert at head method? –  smk Oct 25 '12 at 2:57
    
yeah.. I'm supposed to add the element at the front using dummy header node but no tail pointer.. –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 3:03
    
Small tip, unrelated to the answer: don't start your variables with a capital letter. Classes start with a capital - Head.getSuccessor() looks like you're accessing a static method in the Head class. –  Jiman Oct 25 '12 at 3:04
    
If its only insert at head, why are you passing index to the method? since you know where to insert it to. Seconly inserting at head will not need updating of tail pointer. –  smk Oct 25 '12 at 3:06
    
I also have if(index > 0), but just wanted to check if my (index == 0) is right –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 3:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

That's not a bad way to do it, though using a "dummy" node for "head" is somewhat unusual.

But it has the advantage that you can replace "Head" with "current", initialize that to "Head", then "crawl" up the list index nodes and do your insert, and you wouldn't have to special-case the zero case.

 public void add(int index, E element)  // insert an element in the list 
 {
     // if index is less than 0 or greater than the length
      if( (index < 0) || (index > length ) ) {
           throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();
      }

      // Find insertion point
      SLNode<E> current = Head;
      for (int i = 0; i < index; i++) {
          current = current.getSuccessor();
      }

      // Create & insert new node
      SLNode<E> newnode = new SLNode<E>(element, null);
      newnode.setSuccessor(current.getSuccessor());  
      current.setSuccessor( newnode);
      length++;
  }

(But note that standard naming convention is to reserve names with initial upper-case for class names.)

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Assuming that this is your insert at head method, I dont understand why you need to pass index in. Ideally I would like to have just 1 method for insert. But since you are specfically asking for insert at head.

public void addToHead(E element)  // insert an element at head
     {
         if(length==0)
             throw new Exception("head does not exist");

         element.setSuccessor(head);
         head = element;


         length++;

       }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! (You don't have to make a new node first to add??) –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 3:30
    
Isnt the element you pass into the method essentially the node you want to add? I assumed so. –  smk Oct 25 '12 at 3:32

I don't think you really need to have a special case for inserting at the front of the list. Inserting at the front of this list is no different from inserting anywhere else in the list.

public void add(int index, E element)
{
    // if index is less than 0 or greater than the length
    if ((index < 0) || (index > length))
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException();

    SLNode<E> previousNode = head;
    for ( int i = 0; i < index; i++ ) {
        previousNode = previousNode.getSuccessor();
    }

    SLNode<E> newNode = new SLNode<E>(element, previousNode.getSuccessor());
    previousNode.setSuccessor(newNode);
    length++;
}

Basically, this just traverses the list to find the correct node to insert after - if the index is 0, it immediately stops at head. Once you have the node to insert after, you perform these three steps:

  1. Create a new node and set its successor to the successor of the previous node
  2. Set the successor of the previous node to be the new node
  3. Add one to the length of the list

I ran a couple little tests on this and it seemed to work just fine.

Note that this approach pretty much assumes that head will never actually be considered an element in the list. It's really just a place to start the list. By that, I mean that head.getElement() will always return null - it's not really part of the list. I'm not sure if that's the implementation you wanted, but it seemed to make the most sense when you said that you start the list with a head element, even when the list is supposed to be empty.

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Thank you very much! –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 8:23

Q1. Is this right way of adding element at the front of the list? (using dummy header node, but no tail)

EDIT: After rereading your question, and trying your code, I would say yes.

Q2. Would it be the same whether the list is empty or non-empty?

EDIT: Yes, it appears to work on an empty list.

dummy_header_list<String> theList = new dummy_header_list<String>();
System.out.println(theList);
theList.add(0,"first add");
System.out.println(theList);
theList.add(0,"second add");
System.out.println(theList);
theList.add(0,"third add");
System.out.println(theList);

gives:

[]
[first add]
[second add,first add]
[third add,second add,first add]

with this toString:

public String toString()
{
   String output = "[";
   SLNode<E> temp = Head.getSuccessor();
   while ( temp != null ) {
      if ( output.length() == 1 ) {
         output = output + temp.toString();
      }
      else {
          output = output + "," + temp.toString(); 
      }
      temp = temp.getSuccessor();
   }
   output = output + "]";
   return output;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! (But isn't Head (for dummy header node) always have to point to the node that is null ?? ex. Head -> null -> element & successor ?? –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 3:42
    
@hibc I believe Head stands for "head of the list". Head would be the first value in the list (if the list has items) and would then point to the next item (if one exists), which would point to the next item (if one exists) Head->Node 2->Node 3->Node 4->null The last node in the list is the one that should refer to null. Head should point to null only if the list has 0 or 1 items in this case. –  Scooter Oct 25 '12 at 3:52
    
@hibc I reread the question and now I understand. You are doing a non-traditional linked list. I tried the code and it appears to work fine. That is assuming that head never holds any data. It just points to the first (if any) data item. –  Scooter Oct 25 '12 at 7:08
    
Thank you very much ! –  hibc Oct 25 '12 at 8:22

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