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We're working on a Java project that's closed source, however, we'd like to make the source of several classes available to our clients so they can make changes if necessary. The approach we're hoping to take is to provide the clients with a Java Jar file of the whole project (so they can run it as is), and then also provide them with an Eclipse project that contains the source code for the few classes they might want to change plus all the rest of the code in an obfuscated Jar file. Is this possible? Is it possible to turn part of a project into a Jar file (that's dependent on classes that aren't in the Jar file)? If so, any pointers in how to accomplish this in Eclipse would be much appreciated.

Thanks, Harry

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Consider also offering those extra altered classes as a Service Provider Interface. The user Jars might simply be added to the run-time class-path to make that implementation of the service available. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 25 '12 at 5:20
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3 Answers 3

and then also provide them with an Eclipse project that contains the source code for the few classes they might want to change plus all the rest of the code in an obfuscated Jar file.

While it is possible, the customer can just as well compile those sources using the compiled jar in the classpath. If need be, to avoid confusion you can create two jars, one consisting of classes for which you are shipping sources and the other for rest.

There is no correlation between packages and jar files, classes from same package can come from different jars. They can even be present in multiple jars, in which case which gets loaded depends on which one the classloader finds first.

EDIT: While it is certainly possible to do this, I urge you to look at the Service Provider Interface question Andrew Thompson wrote as a comment. There are many dangers of asking customer to modify existing class; they can make changes that don't satisfy some requirements on the class/methods and that can result in strange bugs. Using an interface that your customer has to implement with a default implementation provided by your procided classes can make this much much cleaner. Roman's answer to that question gives a good example how this can be done.

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Copy paste, the files you you want to put in the jar, into another project.

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My approach would be to make a multimodule project with maven/gradle and configure the packaging process to meet your needs. one module could be the more open and one could be the closed/obfuscated one.

Is it possible to turn part of a project into a Jar file (that's dependent on classes that aren't in the Jar file)?

Yes, Maven is there for that. See the dependencies.

Try out the m2eclipse plugin. Once you get used to Maven, it's a thing you would use for every project which is more than just a "homework"

If you want to reuse the closed source module, there is another entry here: Using closed-source dependencies with Maven

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