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This is what I have so far,

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void main(int argc, char *argv[]){

  FILE *fp;
  char word[30];
  int k;
  for (k=1 ; k < argc ; k++)
    {
      fp = fopen(argv[k],"r");
      if (fp == NULL)
        fprintf(stdout,"Error with file: %s\n",argv[k]);
      else{
        while( !feof(fp) ){
           fscanf(fp,%s%*[^\n]",word);
           printf("word: %s\n",word);
           memset(word,0,sizeof(word));                       
        }
      }
    fclose(fp);
    }
}

I am not sure if what I have is right or not, also I a not sure what I should put inside the while loop to print out each first word of every line in the file. Help would be much appreciated, thank you in advance for any help/tips!

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closed as too localized by Raymond Chen, vanza, Janak Nirmal, M42, Sergey Glotov Oct 25 '12 at 7:42

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Have you learned how to read a line from a file? Also, do you need to process multiple files? Finally, don't forget to close your file(s) when finished reading! –  Ted Hopp Oct 25 '12 at 3:50
    
Print the characters until you reach a space, a newline character or end of file. –  Max Oct 25 '12 at 3:54
    
@Max - "until you reach a space" => "until you reach a space, a newline character, or the end of the file" –  Ted Hopp Oct 25 '12 at 3:55
3  
I think your friend had the same homework assignment stackoverflow.com/questions/3756308/… –  Mikhail Oct 25 '12 at 3:55
1  
Lines can be a lot longer than 30 characters, and you don't make sure that your buffer is not overflowed. POSIX defines a LINE_MAX that is (a minimum of) 2048 bytes. Code with that sort of size in mind. Also, consider reading a whole line with fgets() or readline() and then parsing the first word, printing that, and moving on. The memset() is not really necessary. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 25 '12 at 4:43

2 Answers 2

There are several ways you can do this. One way is to use getline() to read the file line-by-line and then print characters up until the first whitespace character:

#include <ctype.h>

char *line = NULL;
size_t siz = 0;
int i = 0;

while(-1 != getline(&line, &siz, fp)){
    for(i = 0; i < siz && !isspace(line[i]); i++){
        printf("%c", line[i]);
    }
}

This still leaves some edge cases to be handled (blank lines, etc.), but it should get you started.

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2  
Be aware that getline is not part of the C standard. It may be available under some implementations but it's not guaranteed. –  paxdiablo Oct 25 '12 at 4:06
    
Wasn't planning on adding that header file. Updated my code, works but prints an empty word at the end for some reason. –  Michael_19 Oct 25 '12 at 4:10

For a start, you can replace:

int k = 1;
for (k; k < argc; k++)

with the more "standard":

int k;
for (k = 1; k < argc; k++)

Then, inside the else portion, a simple loop and state machine which will only output characters in the first word. The advantage of a character-based state machine is that it doesn't matter how long the lines are, and there's no chance of buffer overflow.

With your 30-character buffer, you'll likely run into problems if you try line-at-a-time processing on a file with (for example) 60 characters on it.

The following pseudo-code may help:

state = before_word
get character from input stream (see fgetc)
while character is not end-of-file:
    if character is newline:
        echo character (see putchar)
        state = before_word
    else
        if state is before_word:
            if character is not white space (see isblank/isspace):
                echo character
                state = in_word
            endif
        else
            if state is in_word:
                if character is white space:
                    state = past_word
                else
                    echo character
                endif
            endif
        endif
    endif
    get character from input stream (see fgetc)
endwhile

It works by maintaining a state (what your state is depending on the things that have come in via the input stream).

The initial state is before_word since that's immediately after the imaginary newline before the first line of the file. In that state, all white space characters are thrown away, the first non white space character causes the state to change to in_word, after echoing that character.

While the state is in_word, every character is output. The first white space character to arrive in that state is not output, and causes the state to shift to past_word.

In past_word state, all characters are thrown away.

In any state (this if statement is first), a newline forces the state to become before_word.

Turning that pseudo-code in to C code will be a good exercise for you, especially if this is homework.


If it's not homework, a solution follows below. Be wary of passing this off as your own work since SO is a public site and I'm sure educators check sites like these for plagiarism. A simple Google search for echoAndChange will almost certainly earn you a fail mark.

So, on the assumption that it's not homework or that you just want something to check your own solution against, here we go:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

// States and utility function for echo and change state.

typedef enum {ST_PRE, ST_IN, ST_POST} tState;

tState echoAndChange (int chr, tState newState) {
    if (chr != EOF) putchar (chr);
    return newState;
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    FILE *fp;
    int k, chr;
    tState state;

    // Process each file.

    for (k = 1; k < argc; k++) {
        fp = fopen (argv[1], "r");
        if (fp == NULL) {
            printf ("Error with file: %s\n", argv[1]);
        } else {
            // Initial state pre-word, then process every character.

            state = ST_PRE;
            while (1) {
                chr = fgetc (fp); if (chr == EOF) break;

                // Newline: output it and change to pre-word.

                if (chr == '\n') {
                    state = echoAndChange (chr, ST_PRE);
                    continue;
                }

                // Pre-word and nonspace: echo and change to in-word.

                if (state == ST_PRE) {
                    if (!isblank (chr))
                        state = echoAndChange (chr, ST_IN);
                    continue;
                }

                // In-word: change to post word if space, otherwise echo.

                if (state == ST_IN)
                    if (isblank (chr))
                        state = echoAndChange (EOF, ST_POST);
                    else
                        state = echoAndChange (chr, ST_IN);
            }
            fclose (fp);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

When running that program on the famous "Lorem ipsum" text:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit,
sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna
aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation
ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit
esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint
occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia
deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

you can see it in action:

Lorem
sed
aliqua.
ullamco
Duis
esse
occaecat
deserunt

If you want a shorter program, you can absorb some of the state machine into the order in which your statements execute (and not worry about leading spaces) with something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    FILE *fp;
    int echo, chr;

    if (argc < 2) {
        puts ("Usage: firstword <input-file>");
        return -1;
    }

    fp = fopen (argv[1], "r");
    if (fp == NULL) {
        printf ("Error with file: %s\n", argv[1]);
        return -1;
    }

    echo = 1;
    chr = fgetc (fp);
    while (chr != EOF) {
        if (chr == '\n') echo = 1;
        if (isblank (chr)) echo = 0;
        if (echo ) putchar (chr);
        chr = fgetc (fp);
    }
    fclose (fp);
    return 0;
}

The basic rules here are:

  • Initial state is echo.
  • Then, for every character:
    • Newline forces echo on (newline echoed two lines down).
    • Any blank turns echo off.
    • Character is echoed if echo on.
share|improve this answer
    
I am actually studtying for a test and this is something that I must know how to do. This was a test questions in the past years test and that I must know in preparation for this test. The only thing that bothers me with your answer, is that it should be a "small" answer that would be possible to write in the code on a test. –  Michael_19 Oct 25 '12 at 5:07
    
@Michael_19, I've added a shorter variant at the end. –  paxdiablo Oct 25 '12 at 5:27

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