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I got a program that writes some data to a file using a method like the one below.


public void ExportToFile(string filename)
{
     using(FileStream fstream = new FileStream(filename,FileMode.Create))
     using (TextWriter writer = new StreamWriter(fstream))
     {
         // try catch block for write permissions 
         writer.WriteLine(text);


     }
}
When running the program I get an error:
Unhandled Exception: System.UnauthorizedAccessException: Access to the path 'mypath' is denied.
   at System.IO.__Error.WinIOError(Int32 errorCode, String maybeFullPath)
   at System.IO.FileStream.Init(String path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access,
nt32 rights, Boolean useRights, FileShare share, Int32 bufferSize, FileOptions
ptions, SECURITY_ATTRIBUTES secAttrs, String msgPath, Boolean bFromProxy)
   at System.IO.FileStream..ctor(String path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access
FileShare share, Int32 bufferSize, FileOptions options, String msgPath, Boolea
bFromProxy)

Question: What code do I need to catch this and how do I grant the access?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 51 down vote accepted

UPDATE:

Modified the code based on this answer to get rid of obsolete methods.

You can use the Security namespace to check this:

public void ExportToFile(string filename)
{
    var permissionSet = new PermissionSet(PermissionState.None);    
    var writePermission = new FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.Write, filename);
    permissionSet.AddPermission(writePermission);

    if (permissionSet.IsSubsetOf(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.PermissionSet))
    {
        using (FileStream fstream = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Create))
        using (TextWriter writer = new StreamWriter(fstream))
        {
            // try catch block for write permissions 
            writer.WriteLine("sometext");


        }
    }
    else
    {
        //perform some recovery action here
    }

}

As far as getting those permission, you are going to have to ask the user to do that for you somehow. If you could programatically do this, then we would all be in trouble ;)

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3  
This solution doesn't work, SecurityManager.IsGranted returns true even though I don't have write permission on the file (Win XP SP3) –  Thomas Levesque Jan 7 '10 at 13:54
1  
Are you running as local Admin, or as a less privileged user who doesn't have access? –  Josh Jan 8 '10 at 3:58
2  
SecurityManager.IsGranted is attributed as Obsolete. This answer might not work forever. –  Mark Aug 3 '11 at 17:35
1  
@Josh I am trying it with .Net 3.5 and it doesn't recognise the PermissionSet part of (AppDomain.CurrentDomain.PermissionSet. Not sure if this is a feature which only came in on .Net 4 or if it was discontinued before 3.5? any idea of an alternative way to do this part? –  Jetnor Jan 22 at 12:51
2  
@Jetnor - You are looking for SecurityManager.IsGranted method. It was deprecated in 4.0 in favor of using PermissionSets. The code above shouldn't be much different, but instead of checking a PermissionSet you only check single permissions at a time. –  Josh Jan 22 at 13:13

When your code does the following:

  1. Checks the current user has permission to do something.
  2. Carries out the action that needs the entitlements checked in 1.

You run the risk that the permissions change between 1 and 2 because you can't predict what else will be happening on the system at runtime. Therefore, your code should handle the situation where an UnauthorisedAccessException is thrown even if you have previously checked permissions.

Note that the SecurityManager class is used to check CAS permissions and doesn't actually check with the OS whether the current user has write access to the specified location (through ACLs and ACEs). As such, IsGranted will always return true for locally running applications.

Example (derived from Josh's example):

//1. Provide early notification that the user does not have permission to write.
FileIOPermission writePermission = new FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.Write, filename);
if(!SecurityManager.IsGranted(writePermission))
{
    //No permission. 
    //Either throw an exception so this can be handled by a calling function
    //or inform the user that they do not have permission to write to the folder and return.
}

//2. Attempt the action but handle permission changes.
try
{
    using (FileStream fstream = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Create))
    using (TextWriter writer = new StreamWriter(fstream))
    {
    	writer.WriteLine("sometext");
    }
}
catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
{
    //No permission. 
    //Either throw an exception so this can be handled by a calling function
    //or inform the user that they do not have permission to write to the folder and return.
}

It's tricky and not recommended to try to programatically calculate the effective permissions from the folder based on the raw ACLs (which are all that are available through the System.Security.AccessControl classes). Other answers on Stack Overflow and the wider web recommend trying to carry out the action to know whether permission is allowed. This post sums up what's required to implement the permission calculation and should be enough to put you off from doing this.

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Sorry, but none of the previous solutions helped me. I need to check both sides: SecurityManager and SO permissions. I have learned a lot with Josh code and with iain answer, but I'm afraid I need to use Rakesh code (also thanks to him). Only one bug: I found that he only checks for Allow and not for Deny permissions. So my proposal is:

        string folder;
        AuthorizationRuleCollection rules;
        try {
            rules = Directory.GetAccessControl(folder)
                .GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.NTAccount));
        } catch(Exception ex) { //Posible UnauthorizedAccessException
            throw new Exception("No permission", ex);
        }

        var rulesCast = rules.Cast<FileSystemAccessRule>();
        if(rulesCast.Any(rule => rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Deny)
            || !rulesCast.Any(rule => rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow))
            throw new Exception("No permission");

        //Here I have permission, ole!
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2  
lol, the "ole!" :D –  Leandro Aug 27 '12 at 14:29

You can try following code block to check if the directory is having Write Access.

It checks the FileSystemAccessRule.

           string directoryPath = "C:\\XYZ"; //folderBrowserDialog.SelectedPath;
           bool isWriteAccess = false;
           try
           {
              AuthorizationRuleCollection collection = Directory.GetAccessControl(directoryPath).GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.NTAccount));
              foreach (FileSystemAccessRule rule in collection)
              {
                 if (rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
                 {
                    isWriteAccess = true;
                    break;
                 }
              }
           }
           catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
           {
              isWriteAccess = false;
           }
           catch (Exception ex)
           {
              isWriteAccess = false;
           }
           if (!isWriteAccess)
           {
             //handle notifications                 
           }
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None of these worked for me.. they return as true, even when they aren't. The problem is, you have to test the available permission against the current process user rights, this tests for file creation rights, just change the FileSystemRights clause to 'Write' to test write access..

/// <summary>
/// Test a directory for create file access permissions
/// </summary>
/// <param name="DirectoryPath">Full directory path</param>
/// <returns>State [bool]</returns>
public static bool DirectoryCanCreate(string DirectoryPath)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(DirectoryPath)) return false;

    try
    {
        AuthorizationRuleCollection rules = Directory.GetAccessControl(DirectoryPath).GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.SecurityIdentifier));
        WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();

        foreach (FileSystemAccessRule rule in rules)
        {
            if (identity.Groups.Contains(rule.IdentityReference))
            {
                if ((FileSystemRights.CreateFiles & rule.FileSystemRights) == FileSystemRights.CreateFiles)
                {
                    if (rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
                        return true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    catch {}
    return false;
}
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