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I want to create an S3 bucket in test, make it a website, and make all objects in it visible. The AWS Policy Generator will take a bucket name, and wants an object name. Can I glob it as bucket/*? Also, the resulting policy JSON contains an ID. Since I may not know the bucket name, does it mean I have to pregenerate policies for all possible buckets? Or is this ID only a unique reference and can be also generated along with the JSON?

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1 Answer 1

Objec Name Wildcard

Can I glob it as bucket/*?

Yes - while the related documentation in Specifying Amazon S3 Resources in Bucket Policies irritatingly only states the format for the resource’s name is bucketname/keyname, where bucketname is the name of the bucket and keyname is the full name of the object and doesn't mention the wildcard (*) option, wildcards are used in the Example Cases for Amazon S3 Bucket Policies and also confirmed in Special Information for Amazon S3 Policies:

The value for Resource must be prefixed with the bucket name or the bucket name and a path under it (bucket/). If only the bucket name is specified, without the trailing /, the policy applies to the bucket.

Policy ID

  • Since I may not know the bucket name, does it mean I have to pregenerate policies for all possible buckets? Or is this ID only a unique reference and can be also generated along with the JSON?

While both Id and Sid are an optional identifier within the Access Policy Language as such, you indeed need to specify unique IDs within Amazon S3 policies in particular, see Special Information for Amazon S3 Policies again:

  • Each policy must have a unique policy ID (Id)
  • Each statement in a policy must have a unique statement ID (sid)

However, you can generate that unique ID yourself along with the JSON - as usual it is recommended to use a UUID for the value, or incorporate a UUID as part of the ID to ensure uniqueness.

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