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I have certain uploaded file code as following:

<script>
var input_file = document.getElementById('txt_list');
input_file.onchange = function() {
           var file = this.files[0];
           var reader = new FileReader();
           reader.onload = function(ev) {
                //myProcesses
           };
           reader.readAsText(file);
        };
</script>

How can I add new function to determine the type of uploaded file either txt, gif, etc? and if i have to validate it, what am i supposed to do then? Thanks in advance

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possible duplicate of How can i get file extensions with javascript? –  Aleks G Oct 25 '12 at 9:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
return (/[.]/.exec(filename)) ? /[^.]+$/.exec(filename) : undefined;

or

return filename.split('.').pop();

please refer this link for more details -LINK

if u need a txt file only

save it to a variable and use a if else statement to verify it

var file=file.split('.').pop();


if (type=='txt'){
//do something
}else{
//do something
}
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what if i'm using top-mentioned codes, what should i do? –  Doni Andri Cahyono Oct 25 '12 at 5:38
    
use this var file=file.split('.').pop(); see my updated answer –  soul Oct 25 '12 at 5:40

split the filename then second part will give you file extension

 return file .split('.').pop();

so if file is name.txt this will return txt

edit-

if you only have to check the filetype

var filetype=file.split('.').pop();
if(filetype!="txt"){
return false;
}
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thanks. Btw, where should I put that line? :) –  Doni Andri Cahyono Oct 25 '12 at 5:22
    
var file = this.files[0]; return file .split('.').pop(); –  Buzz Oct 25 '12 at 5:24
    
ok thanks. And maybe my next question, if it's not too much, what if I have to validate it? I need .txt only, for instance. –  Doni Andri Cahyono Oct 25 '12 at 5:25
    
i did as you said, but apparently it didn't work. –  Doni Andri Cahyono Oct 25 '12 at 5:50

You could use File.type to determine the mime type and check it against valid mime types.

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