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I am trying to run the following query but get an error:

select S 
from St
where  count(

    select *
    from L
    where L.Wh = S

) = 0

I get the error:

error code 1064, SQL state 42000: You have an error in your SQL syntax...

How can I write this query?

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4  
You better explained what you need by words, because right now one of the possible answers to "How can I fix this?" is - "replace it with SELECT S FROM St" – zerkms Oct 25 '12 at 6:50
    
@zerkms I understand the code rather than plain English as English is not my native tongue :-) – Mithun Sreedharan Oct 25 '12 at 7:22
    
@Mithun: it's possible to get it, indeed. But the thing is - that usually wrong query isn't that helpful (and may even lead to a wrong answers), so it's a good idea to add a text description as well. And I hope OP will do that next time. PS: it's not even close to my native language as well ;-) – zerkms Oct 25 '12 at 9:39
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use NOT EXISTS clause.

SELECT S
FROM ST
WHERE NOT EXISTS (    
  SELECT *
  FROM L
  WHERE L.Wh = ST.S
)
share|improve this answer
    
perfection. thanks! – CodeGuy Oct 25 '12 at 6:53

You have to use the COUNT aggregate function inside the subselect, so your subquery returns a single result.

select S 
from St
where (select COUNT(*)
       from L
       where L.Wh = St.S
      ) = 0

If you want to select all the records in "St" who don't have any records in "L", you can also use the NOT EXISTS() function:

SELECT S
FROM St
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM L WHERE L.Wh = St.S)
share|improve this answer
    
now I get "unknown column S in 'where' clause – CodeGuy Oct 25 '12 at 6:51
    
You probably have to add the table name as prefix; otherwise he might not know where to get the "S" from. I updated my answer. – Styxxy Oct 25 '12 at 6:54
    
perfect, thanks! – CodeGuy Oct 25 '12 at 6:54

Try like this

 select s from st
   where (select count(*) from L where l.wh=s)=0
share|improve this answer

Another option is using a join:

select S from St
left join L on St.S = L.Wh
where L.Wh is null

Working example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/d3c23/2

Personally, I usually prefer joins, but yet another option is using not in:

select S from St
where S not in (select Wh from L)

Example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/d3c23/3

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