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Given the matrix:

a =
   1   1   2   2
   1   1   2   2
   3   3   4   4
   3   3   4   4

I would like to get the following four 2x2 matrices:

a1 =
   1   1
   1   1

a2 =
   2   2
   2   2

a3 =
   3   3
   3   3

a4 =
   4   4
   4   4

From there, I would like to take the max of each matrix and then reshape the result into a 2x2 result matrix, like so:

r =
   1   2
   3   4

The location of the result max values relative to their original position in the initial matrix is important.

Currently, I'm using the following code to accomplish this:

w = 2
S = zeros(size(A, 1)/w);
for i = 1:size(S)
  for j = 1:size(S)
    Window = A(i*w-1:i*w, j*w-1:j*w);
    S(i, j) = max(max(Window));
  end
end

This works but it seems like there must be a way that doesn't involve iteration (vectorization).

I tried using reshape like so: reshape(max(max(reshape(A, w, w, []))), w, w, []) however that takes the max of the wrong values and returns:

ans =
   3   4
   3   4

Is there any way to accomplish this without iteration or otherwise improve my iterative method?

share|improve this question
    
Here is a one line method that is 4 times slower than your loop: Soln = cell2mat(cellfun(@max, cellfun(@max, mat2cell(A, [2 2], [2 2]), 'UniformOutput', false), 'UniformOutput', false));. You did ask how to do it without iteration :-) But I've made it a comment, not an answer, because the iteration really is preferable from a speed perspective. –  Colin T Bowers Oct 25 '12 at 7:45
1  
Do you need the intermediate 2x2 matrices for something else, or are you just interested in the final matrix r? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 25 '12 at 7:52
    
yep, that was my thought too... –  bla Oct 25 '12 at 8:12
    
Also, how big are the arrays? Always 4x4 with 2x2 windows? –  Jonas Oct 25 '12 at 8:13
    
I do not need the intermediate 2x2 matrices, just the final matrix. The matrices will almost always be larger than 4x4 and the max could be taken over any tiling of matrices over the original matrix. For a 60x60 matrix, the tilings could be 2x2, 3x3, 4x4, etc. –  Nick Ewing Oct 25 '12 at 17:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not very general, but it works for a:

b = [a(1:2,:) a(3:4,:)];
reshape(max(reshape(b, 4,[])), 2,2).'

The general version of this is a bit *ahum* fuglier:

% window size
W = [2 2];

% number of blocks (rows, cols)
nW = size(a)./W;


% indices to first block
ids = bsxfun(@plus, (1:W(1)).', (0:W(2)-1)*size(a,1));

% indices to all blocks in first block-column
ids = bsxfun(@plus, ids(:), (0:nW(1)-1)*W(1));

% indices to all blocks
ids = reshape(bsxfun(@plus, ids(:), 0:nW(1)*prod(W):numel(a)-1), size(ids,1),[]);

% maxima
M = reshape(max(a(ids)), nW)

It can be done a bit more elegantly:

b = kron(reshape(1:prod(nW), nW), ones(W));    
C = arrayfun(@(x) find(b==x), 1:prod(nW), 'uni', false);    
M = reshape(max(a([C{:}])), nW)

but I doubt that's gonna be faster...

share|improve this answer
    
You have to transpose the result - OP said the order is important. –  angainor Oct 25 '12 at 8:35
    
@angainor: Thanks, edited. Can you perhaps take a look at my second solution, see if the generation of the indices can be done more efficiently? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 25 '12 at 9:03
    
Looks what I was planning to do ;) Though I'm sure it can be done shorter somehow.. –  angainor Oct 25 '12 at 9:32

UPDATE: I'm not sure how I've ended up with the most votes (as of 2012-10-28). For anyone reading this, please see angainor's or Rody's answers for better solutions that don't require any additional toolboxes.

Here is a horse race of every answer thus far (excluding Nates - sorry, don't have the requisite toolbox):

Z = 1000;

A = [1 1 2 2; 1 1 2 2; 3 3 4 4; 3 3 4 4];
w = 2;

%Method 1 (OP method)
tic
for z = 1:Z
S = zeros(size(A, 1)/w);
for i = 1:size(S)
  for j = 1:size(S)
    Window = A(i*w-1:i*w, j*w-1:j*w);
    S(i, j) = max(max(Window));
  end
end
end
toc

%Method 2 (My double loop with improved indexing)
tic
for z = 1:Z
wm = w - 1;
Soln2 = NaN(w, w);
for m = 1:w:size(A, 2)
    for n = 1:w:size(A, 1)
        Soln2((m+1)/2, (n+1)/2) = max(max(A(n:n+wm, m:m+wm)));
    end
end
Soln2 = Soln2';
end
toc


%Method 3 (My one line method)
tic
for z = 1:Z
Soln = cell2mat(cellfun(@max, cellfun(@max, mat2cell(A, [w w], [w w]), 'UniformOutput', false), 'UniformOutput', false));
end
toc

%Method 4 (Rody's method)
tic
for z = 1:Z
b = [A(1:2,:) A(3:4,:)];
reshape(max(reshape(b, 4,[])), 2,2);
end
toc

The results of the speed test (the loop over z) are:

Elapsed time is 0.042246 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.019071 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.165239 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.011743 seconds.

Drat! It appears that Rody (+1) is the winner. :-)

UPDATE: New entrant to the race angainor (+1) takes the lead!

share|improve this answer
1  
Soln2 -> Soln2' –  bla Oct 25 '12 at 8:07
    
@nate Yep, spotted that, although I solved it by switching round the order of the loop. Sorry for not including your method in the horse race, but I don't have the blockproc toolbox –  Colin T Bowers Oct 25 '12 at 8:11
    
No worries! it was fun. –  bla Oct 25 '12 at 8:13
    
@nate Oops, no my switching method didn't work! I've used your suggested transpose instead. Cheers! –  Colin T Bowers Oct 25 '12 at 8:23
    
Looks like we have the same computer, Colin :) –  angainor Oct 25 '12 at 8:41

Another option: slower than the cell2mat(cellfun...) code, but gives the intermediate step:

fun = @(block_struct) reshape((block_struct.data), [],1);
B = reshape(blockproc(A,[2 2],fun),2,2,[])
r=reshape(max(max(B)) ,2,[])

B(:,:,1) =

 1     1
 1     1


B(:,:,2) =

 3     3
 3     3


B(:,:,3) =

 2     2
 2     2


B(:,:,4) =

 4     4
 4     4

r =

 1     2
 3     4
share|improve this answer

I'll join the horse-race with another non-general (yet;) solution, based on linear indices

idx = [1 2 5 6; 3 4 7 8]';
splita = [A(idx) A(idx+8)];
reshape(max(splita), 2, 2);

The times obtained by Colins code, my method last:

Elapsed time is 0.039565 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.021723 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.168946 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.011688 seconds.
Elapsed time is 0.006255 seconds.

The idx array can be easily generalized to larger windows and system sizes.

share|improve this answer
    
Very neat! I was just working on a similar idea with linear indices, but hadn't managed to get the time below Rody's. +1! Time for me to get back to work I think... –  Colin T Bowers Oct 25 '12 at 8:55
    
Would there be a way to generalize the creation of the idx matrix to support any given original matrix and window size? –  Nick Ewing Oct 25 '12 at 18:08
    
@NickEwing Rody has shown a method in his extended answer. The version with bsxfun is what you are looking for. –  angainor Oct 25 '12 at 18:46

Note: Nate's solution uses the Image Processing Toolbox function |blockproc|. I would rewrite that:

fun = @(x) max(max(x.data));
r = blockproc(A,[2 2],fun)

Comparing timing across different computers is fraught with difficulties, as is timing things once that are happening in a fraction of a second. TIMEIT would be useful here:

http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/18798

But timing this on my computer with tic/toc took 0.008 seconds.

Cheers, Brett

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Brett. Agreed that timeit is a great tool if one wants to time function performance properly. However, note that above we're actually looping over each routine 1000 times, not once, thus the results can be thought of as an (unscaled) arithmetic average which should smooth things out a little. It definitely won't be as robust as timeit and switching across computers definitely adds noise, but sometimes when you're hacking around for an SO question it is just easier to not have to bother with function handles etc :-) –  Colin T Bowers Oct 28 '12 at 2:19

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