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I'm trying to read a process memory using the following code:

void readdata(HANDLE phandle, LPCVOID paddress, SIZE_T datasize)
{
    char *buff;
    SIZE_T dataread;
    BOOL b = FALSE;

    buff = (char *) malloc (datasize);

    b = ReadProcessMemory(phandle, paddress, (LPVOID)buff, datasize, &dataread); 
    if(!b)
    {
    	printf("error reading memory, err = %d\n", GetLastError());
    	return;
    }

    printf("Data Read             = %d\n", dataread);
    printf("Len of actual buffer  = %d\n", strlen(buff));
    printf("Data = %s\n", buff);

    free(buff);
    return;
}

Now, phandle and paddress are known becuase I used WriteProcessMemory. I have the values from there. datasize is also known.

The function works ok, except for the following. ReadProcessMemory() returns dataread = 41 (which is correct, I passed 41 to datasize) but the actual length of the buff is 49. when I print buff i get my string + some garbage.

What am I doing wrong?

code is appreciated.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The '\0' at the end of your string is likely not being copied, either out of your buffer when you write, or into your buffer when you read. As a result, printf() is just going to print from the beginning of your string until it sees a '\0', which may be after a number of garbage characters.

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OK, how would I fix this (if this is the case)? I am writing the string there myself. the string is (for testing): "<1234567890> <hello> <world> <1234567890>\0" –  wonderer Aug 20 '09 at 14:14
    
Are you writing strlen(string) bytes? If so, strlen() does not include the '\0', so you need to add one to the count there. –  Jonathan Aug 20 '09 at 14:41
    
got it. thanks! –  wonderer Aug 20 '09 at 14:55

Do you know that the data you read is a string? Ie. that it's null terminated? If not then using strlen() is guaranteed to be unreliable.

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yes, it is a string. I put it there (including the NULL char at the end) –  wonderer Aug 20 '09 at 14:13
    
you put strlen() + 1 bytes? Then, sorry guv, no idea. –  djna Aug 20 '09 at 14:31

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