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I have read the following article http://lifehacker.com/5919918/how-your-passwords-are-stored-on-the-internet-and-when-your-password-strength-doesnt-matter

There are a number of ways a site can store your password, and some are considerably more secure than others. Here's a quick rundown of the most popular methods, and what they mean for the security of your data.

Method One: Plain Text Passwords How It Works: The simplest way a site can store your password is in plain text. That means somewhere on a their server, there exists a database with your username and password in it in a human-readable form (that is, if your password is testing123, it is stored in the database as testing123). When you enter your credentials on the site, it checks them against the database to see if they match. This is the worst possible method, in security terms, and most reputable web sites do not store passwords in plain text. If someone hacks this database, everyone's password is immediately compromised.

Does My Strong Password Matter? No way. No matter how long or strong your password may be, if it's stored in plain text and the site gets hacked, your password is easily accessible to anyone, no work required. It still matters in terms of hiding your passwords from, say, your friends, or others that could easily guess it, but it won't make any difference if the site gets hacked.

Method Two: Basic Password Encryption How It Works: To add more protection to your password than plain text provides, most sites encrypt your password before they store it on their servers. Encryption, for those of you that don't know, uses a special key to turn your password into a random string of text. If a hacker were to get hold of this random string of text, they wouldn't be able to log into your account unless they also had the key, which they could then use to decrypt it.

The problem is, the key is often stored on the very same server that the passwords are, so if the servers get hacked, a hacker doesn't have to do much work to decrypt all the passwords, which means this method is still wildly insecure.

Does My Strong Password Matter? No. Since it's easy to decrypt the password database with a key, your strong password won't make a difference here either. Again: this is in terms of the site getting hacked; if you have a nosy friend or family member rooting through your stuff, a strong password can help keep them from guessing it.

Method Three: Hashed Passwords How It Works: Hashed is similar to encryption in the sense that it turns your password into a long string of letters and numbers to keep it hidden. However, unlike encryption, hashing is a one way street: If you have the hash, you can't run the algorithm backwards to get the original password. This means a hacker would have to obtain the hashes and then try a number of different password combinations to see which ones worked.

However, there is a downside to this method. While a hacker can't decode a hash back to the original password, they can try many different passwords until one matches the hash they have. Computers can do this very fast, and with the help of something called rainbow tables—which is essentially a list of trillions of different hashes and their matching passwords—they can just look up the hash to see if it's already been discovered. Try typing e38ad214943daad1d64c102faec29de4afe9da3d into Google. You'll quickly find that it's the SHA-1 hash for "password1". For more information on how rainbow tables work, check out this article by coding guru Jeff Atwood on the subject.

Does My Strong Password Matter? In this case, yes. Rainbow tables are made up of passwords that have already been tested against hashes, which means the really weak ones will be cracked very quickly. Their biggest weakness, however, isn't complexity, but length. You're better off using a very long password (like XKCD's famous "correct horse battery staple") rather than a short, complex one (like kj$fsDl#).

Method Four: Hashed Passwords with a Dash of Salt How It Works: Salting a hash means adding a random string of characters—called a "salt"—to the beginning or end of your password before hashing it. It uses a different salt for each password, and even if the salts are stored on the same servers, it will make it very hard to find those salted hashes in the rainbow tables, since each one is long, complex, and unique. LinkedIn is famous for not using salted hashes, which brought them under a lot of scrutiny after their recent hack—had they used salts, their users would have been safer.

By reading the above article i have the following questions in mind

1.Even if i do not have the password,i still can intercept the message digest......i dont even need the password ...i will simply launch reply attack(ie. send message digest itself for authentication after intercepting it!!)

the solution to above problem can be solved by following way a.server genrates a random string(usually known as challenge) to the user and asks him to encrypt it with his password ..... b.user enters his password,message digest of the password is created ,random string is encrypted by this message digest c.this encrypted string is sent to server. d.server also encrypts random string with message digest of user,checks it with encrypted string recieved from user,if both match,he is valid user..!

2.My question is If the hacker gets access to the database,he will get access to the messagedigests/even if he does not get access to database,he can still obtain message digest while intecepting communication link when user first registers to DB......how this can be prevented??

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Didn't read the whole question, but if website's database is hacked, then there is nothing to do with passwords, I guess –  user517491 Oct 25 '12 at 8:55

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User registration should always be done through an SSL tunnel, so generally when following best practice you never have to worry about man in the middle type attacks.

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Even if i do not have the password,i still can intercept the message digest......i dont even need the password ...i will simply launch reply attack(ie. send message digest itself for authentication after intercepting it!!)

This shouldn't be possible.

The client should send the real password to the server. It should be encrypted using SSL.

The server should hash the password and compare it to the stored, hashed password.

the solution to above problem…

That is, more or less, part of what SSL does.

My question is If the hacker gets access to the database,he will get access to the messagedigests

This is a relatively insignificant problem. The passwords should be stored as hashes with varied salts. The original passwords are protected.

even if he does not get access to database,he can still obtain message digest while intecepting communication link when user first registers to DB

Only if SSL is broken.

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thanxx a lot Quentin and Jroc.....helped a lot..! –  varun Oct 25 '12 at 11:06

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