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We maintain a huge number of perl modules, actualy its so huge that we don't even know of all modules that we are responsible for. We would like to track what scripts and modules accesses another module in some sort of log, preferably stored by module name, so that we can evaluate whether its a risk to update a module and so that we can know what we might affect.

Is there any simple way to do this?

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You could probably massage it out of %main:: –  Zaid Oct 25 '12 at 10:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe edit sitecustomize.pl so that each time when Perl runs, it would write some info in a log, and then analyse it? Add something like this to sitecustomize.pl:

open (LOG, '>>',"absolutepathto/logfile.txt");
print LOG $0,"\t",$$,"\t",scalar(localtime),"\n";
open SELF, $0;
while (<SELF>) {
print LOG $_ if (/use|require/);
}
close SELF;
print LOG "_" x 80,"\n";
close LOG;

EDIT: Also, we forgot about %INC hash, so the code above may be rewritten as follows, to include more data about which modules were actually loaded + include files required by do function:

open (LOG, '>>',"absolutepathto/logfile.txt");
print LOG $0,' ',$$,' ',scalar(localtime),"\n";
open SELF, $0;
while (<SELF>) {
print LOG $_ if (/use|require/);
}
close SELF;
END {
local $" = "\n";
print LOG "Files loaded by use, eval, or do functions at the end of this program run:\n";
print LOG "@{[values %INC]}","\n";
print LOG "_" x 80,"\n";
close LOG;
}
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3  
If using a simple regex search, then why do it at run-time? This would really slow things down if you have scripts that are invoked often--for example, a CGI script. sitecustomize.pl is a nice trick I didn't know about, however. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 10:18
    
Obviously, don't let it stay forever - just until you have enough information about which scripts are evoked and which modules they use. This way you would evade redacting of a lot of scripts, what could end up rather nasty. –  Basil Oct 25 '12 at 10:46
    
we could print the full thing without regular expressions and then parse it later. I might try this and will come back. –  Pablo Karlsson Oct 25 '12 at 10:58
    
@PabloKarlsson, the regular expressions will be quite fast compared to the file i/o. Doing some parsing at run time doesn't hurt; it may even be faster than copying the whole file. Why not just store the name of the script that ran ($0)? Then you can come back later and open the file and parse it. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 11:45
    
That is a good idea to .. I really just need to know what scripts used a module over a week or so. –  Pablo Karlsson Oct 25 '12 at 12:02
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You could do a simple regex search:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %modules;

foreach my $perl_file (@file_list) {

    open FILE, $perl_file or die "Can't open $perl_file ($!)";
    while (<FILE>) {

        if (/\s*(?:use|require)\s*([^;]+);/) {

            $modules{$1}{$perl_file}++;
        }
    }
}

This is quick and dirty, but it should work pretty well. You end up with a hash of modules, each of which points to a hash of the files that use it.

Of course, it will catch things like use strict; but those will be easy enough to ignore.

If you have things like use Module qw/function/; You will grab the whole thing before the semicolon, but it shouldn't be a big deal. You can just search the keys for your known module names.

A downside is that it doesn't track dependencies. If you need that information you could add it by getting it from cpan or something.

Update: If you want to log this at runtime, you could create a wrapper script and have your perl command point to the wrapper on your system. Then make the wrapper something like this:

use strict;
use warnings;

use Module::Loaded;

my $script = shift @ARGV;
#run program
do $script;

#is_loaded() gets the path of these modules if they are loaded.
print is_loaded('Some::Module');
print is_loaded('Another::Module');

You might run the risk of funny side effects, though, since the method of calling your script has changed. It depends on what you are doing.

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I think that would take to long time. I would prefer code inside the module that can tell from where it was accessed and preferably when to. I could then add that code to the module I would like to monitor is that possible? –  Pablo Karlsson Oct 25 '12 at 9:13
    
@PabloKarlsson, I would recommend against editing all of the modules. Then what happens when you upgrade them? The regex should be fast, but I added another way if you really want to log it at runtime. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 9:35
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