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I discovered that

ls -AF /var/ |grep \/$

helps me to find all directories from a directories without more information. Now i need exactly the opposite - showing all files without any further information just the file name in each line

file1
file2
file3

and filtering the directories because those - i don't need

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type: man ls ENTER –  piokuc Oct 25 '12 at 8:55
    
@piokuc And how would the manpage for ls help in this case? –  Shawn Chin Oct 25 '12 at 8:59
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For finding files matching a certain expression there exists find. Its man-page is quite good and includes also some interesting examples. For getting only the files of a directory you can use:

find /var -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf "%f\n"
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Just use the -v switch for grep to invert the match:

ls -AF /var/ |grep -v /$ 
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Or use find :

find -maxdepth 1 -type f /var/
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Several issues with that command. The path is missing, -maxdepth has to come before -type, and it does not give what the OP wants (show only filenames without the path) –  Shawn Chin Oct 25 '12 at 9:01
    
path is not mandatory, but you need -maxdepth before -type –  c00kiemon5ter Oct 25 '12 at 9:01
    
path is required if you the target directory is not pwd, which appears to be the case in this question. –  Shawn Chin Oct 25 '12 at 9:03
    
eh, yeah, ofcourse you need path in that case :) –  c00kiemon5ter Oct 25 '12 at 9:03
    
Sorry, didn't have a terminal available to test. Lothar Krause's answer is better anyway, didn't think the trailing / and beginning ./ were going to be a problem for the OP. –  pistache Oct 25 '12 at 9:08
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