Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Sorry for the sorry title. I could not think of anything better

I am trying to implement a DSL with pyparsing that has the following requirements:

  1. varaibles: All of them begin with v_
  2. Unary operators: +, -
  3. Binary operators: +,-,*,/,%
  4. Constant numbers
  5. Functions, like normal functions when they have just one variable
  6. Functions need to work like this: foo(v_1+v_2) = foo(v_1) + foo(v_2), foo(bar(10*v_6))=foo(bar(10))*foo(bar(v_6)). It should be the case for any binary operation

I am able to get 1-5 working

This is the code I have so far

from pyparsing import *

exprstack = []

#~ @traceParseAction
def pushFirst(tokens):
    exprstack.insert(0,tokens[0])

# define grammar
point = Literal( '.' )
plusorminus = Literal( '+' ) | Literal( '-' )
number = Word( nums )
integer = Combine( Optional( plusorminus ) + number )
floatnumber = Combine( integer +
                       Optional( point + Optional( number ) ) +
                       Optional( integer )
                     )

ident = Combine("v_" + Word(nums))

plus  = Literal( "+" )
minus = Literal( "-" )
mult  = Literal( "*" )
div   = Literal( "/" )
cent   = Literal( "%" )
lpar  = Literal( "(" ).suppress()
rpar  = Literal( ")" ).suppress()
addop  = plus | minus
multop = mult | div | cent
expop = Literal( "^" )
band = Literal( "@" )

# define expr as Forward, since we will reference it in atom
expr = Forward()
fn = Word( alphas )
atom = ( ( floatnumber | integer | ident | ( fn + lpar + expr + rpar ) ).setParseAction(pushFirst) |
         ( lpar + expr.suppress() + rpar ))

factor = Forward()
factor << atom + ( ( band + factor ).setParseAction( pushFirst ) | ZeroOrMore( ( expop + factor ).setParseAction( pushFirst ) ) )

term = factor + ZeroOrMore( ( multop + factor ).setParseAction( pushFirst ) )
expr << term + ZeroOrMore( ( addop + term ).setParseAction( pushFirst ) )
print(expr)
bnf = expr

pattern =  bnf + StringEnd()


def test(s):
    del exprstack[:]
    bnf.parseString(s,parseAll=True)
    print exprstack

test("avg(+10)")
test("v_1+8")
test("avg(v_1+10)+10")

Here is the what I want.

My functions are of this type:

foo(v_1+v_2) = foo(v_1) + foo(v_2)

The same behaviour is expected for any other binary operation as well. I have no idea how to make the parser do this automatically.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Break out the function call as a separate sub expression:

function_call = fn + lpar + expr + rpar

Then add a parse action to function_call that pops the operators and operands from expr_stack, then pushes them back onto the stack:

  • if an operand, push operand then function
  • if an operator, push the operator

Since you are only doing binary operations, you might be better off doing a simple approach first:

expr = Forward()
identifier = Word(alphas+'_', alphanums+'_')
expr = Forward()
function_call = Group(identifier + LPAR + Group(expr) + RPAR)

unop = oneOf("+ -")
binop = oneOf("+ - * / %")
operand = Group(Optional(unop) + (function_call | number | identifier))
binexpr = operand + binop + operand

expr << (binexpr | operand)

bnf = expr

This gives you a simpler structure to work with, without having to mess with exprstack.

def test(s):
    exprtokens = bnf.parseString(s,parseAll=True)
    print exprtokens

test("10")
test("10+20")
test("avg(10)")
test("avg(+10)")
test("column_1+8")
test("avg(column_1+10)+10")

Gives:

[['10']]
[['10'], '+', ['20']]
[[['avg', [['10']]]]]
[[['avg', [['+', '10']]]]]
[['column_1'], '+', ['8']]
[[['avg', [['column_1'], '+', ['10']]]], '+', ['10']]

You want to expand fn(a op b) to fn(a) op fn(b), but fn(a) should be left alone, so you need to test on the length of the parsed expression argument:

def distribute_function(tokens):
    # unpack function name and arguments
    fname, args = tokens[0]

    # if args contains an expression, expand it
    if len(args) > 1:
        ret = ParseResults([])
        for i,a in enumerate(args):
            if i % 2 == 0:
                # even args are operands to be wrapped in the function
                ret += ParseResults([ParseResults([fname,ParseResults([a])])])
            else:
                # odd args are operators, just add them to the results
                ret += ParseResults([a])
        return ParseResults([ret])
function_call.setParseAction(distribute_function)        

Now your calls to test will look like:

[['10']]
[['10'], '+', ['20']]
[[['avg', [['10']]]]]
[[['avg', [['+', '10']]]]]
[['column_1'], '+', ['8']]
[[[['avg', [['column_1']]], '+', ['avg', [['10']]]]], '+', ['10']]

This should even work recursively with a call like fna(fnb(3+2)+fnc(4+9)).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for writing that awesome library – CivFiveAddict Oct 26 '12 at 4:27
    
But id does not parse 10+10+10; Sorry I did not mention int the question, but I need to be able to parse things such as 10+column_8+cos(column_8) – CivFiveAddict Oct 26 '12 at 5:50
    
This can be done by changing 1 line of the program. I'll check back tomorrow to see if you have solved this for yourself. – Paul McGuire Oct 26 '12 at 8:32
    
I have tried but I have not figured it out yet. Honestly I do not have a formal education in computer science and I did not know there was something called as parser till the beginning of last week. I wrote programs and they used to get executed magically, so to say. Now just give me a hint. – CivFiveAddict Oct 27 '12 at 4:10
    
binexpr is currently a match for operand op operand, but you need operand (op operand)+. Do this by changing binexpr = operand + binop + operand to binexpr = operand + OneOrMore(binop + operand). – Paul McGuire Oct 27 '12 at 5:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.