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I am reading in hundreds of HDF files and processing the data of each HDF seperately. However, this takes an awful amount of time, since it is working on one HDF file at a time. I just stumbled upon http://docs.python.org/library/multiprocessing.html and am now wondering how I can speed things up using multiprocessing.

So far, I came up with this:

import numpy as np
from multiprocessing import Pool

def myhdf(date):
    ii      = dates.index(date)
    year    = date[0:4]
    month   = date[4:6]
    day     = date[6:8]
    rootdir = 'data/mydata/'
    filename = 'no2track'+year+month+day
    records = read_my_hdf(rootdir,filename)
    if records.size:
        results[ii] = np.mean(records)

dates = ['20080105','20080106','20080107','20080108','20080109']
results = np.zeros(len(dates))

pool = Pool(len(dates))
pool.map(myhdf,dates)

However, this is obviously not correct. Can you follow my chain of thought what I want to do? What do I need to change?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Pool classes map function is like the standard python libraries map function, you're guaranteed to get your results back in the order that you put them in. Knowing that, the only other trick is that you need to return results in a consistant manner, and the filter them afterwards.

import numpy as np
from multiprocessing import Pool

def myhdf(date):
    year    = date[0:4]
    month   = date[4:6]
    day     = date[6:8]
    rootdir = 'data/mydata/'
    filename = 'no2track'+year+month+day
    records = read_my_hdf(rootdir,filename)
    if records.size:
        return np.mean(records)

dates = ['20080105','20080106','20080107','20080108','20080109']

pool = Pool(len(dates))
results = pool.map(myhdf,dates)
results = [ result for result in results if result ]
results = np.array(results)

If you really do want results as soon as they are available you can use imap_unordered

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That makes sense. One more question: with Pool(number) I am specifying the number of parallel processes? So in case I have a lot of HDF files (>1000), I should keep the pool value at around 4-5? – HyperCube Oct 25 '12 at 11:20
    
A good rule of thumb is one process for every physical core. – Andrew Walker Oct 25 '12 at 11:22

Try joblib for a friendlier multiprocessing wrapper:

from joblib import Parallel, delayed

def myhdf(date):
    # do work
    return np.mean(records)

results = Parallel(n_jobs=-1)(delayed(myhdf)(d) for d in dates)
share|improve this answer
    
Other great libraries that achieve similar things to joblib and multiprocessing (including distributed job execution) are ipython parallel and celery – Andrew Walker Oct 25 '12 at 11:44
    
@AndrewWalker: except that those are distributed, right? Joblib is just a wrapper around multiprocessing with some smart pickling. – larsmans Oct 25 '12 at 11:44
1  
Yep, distributed and local modes for both. But I think it's worth noting that there are alternative modules that scale up. – Andrew Walker Oct 25 '12 at 11:48

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