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let's say I have a matrix (array) like this example, but much larger:

0 0 5 0 3 6 6 4 0 3 0 8 0 1 1
9 4 0 6 0 0 0 4 1 0 6 0 7 0 0
3 1 6 1 5 0 8 0 8 0 3 2 6 4 8
1 0 2 2 8 5 8 1 8 7 4 1 0 3 0
6 3 8 1 0 0 4 0 0 3 1 5 2 0 0
0 0 5 0 3 6 6 4 0 3 0 8 0 1 1
9 4 0 6 0 0 0 4 1 0 6 0 7 0 0
3 1 6 1 5 0 8 0 8 0 3 2 6 4 8
1 0 2 2 8 5 8 1 8 7 4 1 0 3 0
6 3 8 1 0 0 4 0 9 4 1 5 2 0 0

I'm trying to determine the position of two equal numbers with greatest distance between them in the array in a diagonal, horizontal or vertical straight line, with the distance calculated as the count of numbers between them (distance d >= 0).

Other Constraints:

  • The straight line as described above may not contain the same number that is marking its beginning and end, so you can't have 6 0 4 5 6 1 7 3 5 6 and say distance 6..6 is 8 as there is a 6 in the sequence.
  • The numbers to look for are not given but must be determined dynamically.

In the example the result (considering the array as a regular X|Y coord system with 0, 0 in the lower left) it should determine P1(0, 8), P2(8, 0) with d = 7 (number: 9).

Any good ideas on how to do this efficiently? I'm using C# but examples/ideas in other languages are appreciated too.

In case you wonder where this question comes from, I've been thinking about various math related challenges that I believe are tough to solve (for myself) and hope to get a better handle on such problems by seeing how others solve such issues. Thank you!

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"The numbers to look for are not given but must be determined dynamically."<br> Sorry i didn't understand this? are u saying (e.g) the no [6] is not given? – RubyDubee Aug 20 '09 at 14:27
    
If the distance between (0,8) and (8,0) is 8, then the distance in your false example with the sixes should be 9, not 8. – Aric TenEyck Aug 20 '09 at 14:31
    
Yes, exactly. The number limiting the greatest distance is not given (in the example, it was number 9 at P1(0, 8)/P2(8, 0) with d=8, but '9' was not given to the program but determined dynamically). – Alex Aug 20 '09 at 14:31
    
@Aric: I corrected the example between 9..9 to distance d=7. Thanks! – Alex Aug 20 '09 at 14:32
1  
This reminds me of a similar geometrical problem; solving the discrete problem in an array is quite a bit easier than solving it on a continuously varying manifold! blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2004/12/15/… – Eric Lippert Aug 20 '09 at 16:29
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Algorithm:

Simplify the problem. It is equivalent to solving the 1-dimensional version (find largest gap between equal values in a list) once per row, column and diagonal then returning the maximum.

Simplify more. The 1-dimensional version is pretty easy. You just build a Dictionary which maps values to a list of their positions, solve the trivial problem of 'what is the largest delta in this list of positions' for each value, and return the maximum.

Analysis:

The trivial problem takes linear time in the size of the position list (because the list is sorted [by the natural insertion order]). Therefore the 1-dim gap problem takes linear time in the size of the value list (because there is one position per value). Therefore the 2-dim gap problem takes linear time in the size of the matrix (because each value is included in exactly four 1-dim sub-problems).

So if the matrix is n*m, the solution will take O(n*m) time. It requires O(n+m) space (to store the value->positions dictionary during each 1-dim phase). I really doubt you'll do better (the time is clearly optimal, not so sure about the size).

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1  
I like your approach. However, wouldn't it be 4 sub problems (horizontal, vertical, 2x diagonal) instead of three? – Alex Aug 20 '09 at 14:52
    
Yes, I assumed you were only looking at one of the diagonal directions. I change 3 to 4. – Craig Gidney Aug 20 '09 at 14:56

I don't see how you can do this really any faster besides just iterating through each row, each column, and each diagonal (you can tell if something's on the same diagonal by taking the absolute value of the difference of its X and Y coordinates, of course) and keeping track of the most recent coordinates of each number you see, and the greatest observed separation.

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The main idea of the following is to iterate through the array once, keeping track of the last found location in each row (hor), column (vert), and top to bottom diagonal (td) and bottom to top diagonal (dt). with this, you just find the distance to the last location for each direction and take the max.

EDIT: One other note, it looks like the question is asking for you to figure out the greatest distance between any same numbers, which i didnt understand when i wrote out the code. To fix this, you'd just need to create a dictionary or array (if you know the range of numbers that can exist), to hold collections of vert/hor/dt/td for each number and use those instead of the if yournum. It should still only require one time through the array.

int findmax(int[,] myarray, int height, int width, int yournum)
{
int diagnum = width + height - 1;

int[] vert = new int[width];
int[] hor  = new int[height];

int[] td   = new int[diagnum];
int[] dt   = new int[diagnum];

for (int x = 0; x < width; x++)
{
   vert[x] = -1;
}
for (int x = 0; x < height; x++)
{
   hor[x] = -1;
}
for (int x = 0; x < diagnum; x++)
{
   td[x] = -1;
   dt[x] = -1;
}

int maxlen = 0;

for (int x = 0; x < width; x++)
{
   for (int y = 0; y < height; y++)
   {
      if (myarray[y,x] == yournum)
      {
         if (vert[x] == -1)
         {
            vert[x] = y;
         }
         else
         {
            maxlen = Math.Max(maxlen, Math.Abs(y - vert[x] - 1));
            vert[x] = y;
         }
         if (hor[x] == -1)
         {
            hor[x] = y;
         }
         else
         {
            maxlen = Math.Max(maxlen, Math.Abs(x - hor[y] - 1));
            hor[y] = x;
         }

         int tdcol = x - y + height - 1;
         int tdloc = Math.Abs(Math.Max(0, tdcol - height + 1) - x);
         if (td[tdcol] == -1)
         {
            td[tdcol] = tdloc;
         }
         else
         {
            maxlen = Math.Max(maxlen, Math.Abs(tdloc - td[tdcol] - 1));
            td[tdcol] = tdloc;
         }
         int dtcol = y + x;
         int dtloc = Math.Abs(Math.Max(0,dtcol-height+1) - x);
         if (dt[dtcol] == -1)
         {
            dt[dtcol] = dtloc;
         }
         else
         {
            maxlen = Math.Max(maxlen, Math.Abs(dtloc - dt[dtcol] - 1));
            dt[dtcol] = dtloc;
         }
      }
   }
}
return maxlen;
}

EDIT I double checked the equations, but haven't actually tried to build/test the code, so there might be some compilation issues or logic issues, but it seems like this should work. The main part is getting the equations right, which allows you to get around having to iterate through the array multiple times (ie one per direction).

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assuming that the distance must be a direct path between the two identical number (ie no roundabouts or infinite loops).

  1. create an array of 10 (for the digitsthat appear in the problem)
    • DIGIT_STRUCT[10]
  2. create an array for each digit for each position of that digit. ie sample the whole grid and arrange it by number.
    • DIGIT_STRUCT[n].POSTITIONS[]
  3. pick out a combo of those positions that are the maximum distance
    • this is the tricky part. but since diagonal moves are allowed, and the table is square, i believe that you can actually rank each postition by its distance from the origin (0,0). you would just have to pick out the first and last occurence (by rank). its a sort, for each digit list
    • DIGIT_STRUCT[n].MAX_DIST {POSITION a, POSITION b}
  4. make sure that at least one minimal path for each MAX_DIST exists without hitting another position number. the path would only be blocked if a whole row or column was filled with that number. in your 6 example a whole column is blocked out on the subgrid by another 6.
  5. compare each digits maximum distance.

not all the work needs to be done here, you do not need to validate paths that are obviously going to be shorter. if a path is invalidated you do not need to search for a different position combo (right away), if another digit contains the same distance path.

if you find a potential path of grid size (16 in your example) you should just try and validate that one since no others are going to be longer.

validating a path should require two arrays of subgrid size, hor and vert, add a number to each vert[x], and hor[y] for each POSTITION(x,y) in DIGIT_STRUCT that is within the subgrid. if there doesnt exist a vert[n] or hor[m] that equals the subgrid size you know that the shortest path there will not be blocked.

EDIT

forgot that a path may be suboptimal. if there exists a situation like

0 0 1 1
1 0 1 1
1 0 0 0
1 1 1 0

the answer here would be 0, path = 6, from (0, 0) to (3, 3)

in this case you would have to validate a path for every number, and that validation should return a distance. because the distance of a path may increase you would have to validate a lot more paths for each number (the distance may at most double).

Q. are you forced to take the most direct path? in this case (square sub grid) there is only one direct path and its blocked. if you are you are forced to do that then i think you can gain some performance back by knowing the path wont increase during the validation.

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I'm not sure if I understand what you mean by being forced to take the most direct path. Please explain! – Alex Aug 20 '09 at 18:25
    
in the example above, the longest path is 6, but if you are forced to take a direct path the longest distance could be at most 3. are you forced to take the shortest distance, between the two furthest away points? – aepurniet Aug 22 '09 at 16:56
    
Yes, shortest distance matters inherently as you can't combine horizontally + vertically or such (it has to be either or the other). Great post btw! – Alex Aug 23 '09 at 7:35

Since you are looking for the longest "segment," start your search with the longest possible segments and work to the shorter segments. By starting at the large end, you can stop as soon as you find a segment with matching end numbers. This assumes you only have to return a single segment that is longer OR EQUAL TO any other segment.

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