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Here is my problem. for example,

 A---B---C topic
     /
D---E---F---G master

The content of fileA on E commit (common ancestor of topic and master) is:

abc def

fileA on the topic branch is :

abc def
abc

fileA on the master branch is :

abc def
abc
gh  //added by master.

When doing "git checkout master; git merge topic", a new fileA would be got:

abc def
abc
gh

But I do not want this happen, if it get differences on any 2 files on the merge branches, I want git to quit and throw me a error message or something like that.

Thanks for VonC's editing and answer. I would notice the question format next time:).

But if someone else changed another files in topic ,while not changed in master since commit E, i could allow it merge into my branch.I may not express it clearly before

Why I need this?
Because I just want to make sure my patch will produce "my own" changes compared with my original fileA if I did not aware that someone else has did a new change to the same file, even though they could be merged.

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To get merge in changes from a particular commit you can use Git Cherry Pick wiki.koha-community.org/wiki/Using_Git_Cherry_Pick –  Nick Oct 25 '12 at 9:42

2 Answers 2

currently, I could identify if git is merging different changes in the same file by the git output: Auto-merging ............

I will use the "git merge --no-commit" to test the output. That is my workaround solution..

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Good point. I have included this option in my answer. –  VonC Oct 26 '12 at 4:34

I just want to make sure my patch will produce "my own" changes compared with my original fileA if I did not aware that someone else has did a new change to the same file,

That means master could be fast-forwarded to topic, since topic would have added new commits, while master would have not:

You can test if it is the case, by trying first a:

git checkout topic git merge --ff-only master

Then you can merge topic to master (trivial merge).

If you want only to test:

    git checkout topic git merge --ff-only --no-commit master

No need to parse the output: if the command completes, that means the merge will be a fast-forward one.
(--no-commit after the suggestion of the OP Keith)

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Thanks for your editing and answer. I would notice the question format next time:). –  Keith Oct 25 '12 at 23:55

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