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I am trying to know if a value ($x) is 50% bigger or smaller than a value ($y).

I am doing this:

$diff = ($x - $y) / $x;

if (abs($diff) > 0.5) {

echo "it's happening";
}

The problem is when $x is 0. How can I solve that cleanly? Notice that I want to be able to calculate the increment/decrement even when the value is 0.

share|improve this question
    
check whether $x is not equal to 0 before calculate $diff – Prasath Albert Oct 25 '12 at 10:07
    
Prasath, but if is zero I still want to calculate if the increment/decrement is bigger than 50% – Hommer Smith Oct 25 '12 at 10:08
4  
If $x is zero, then (unless $y is zero as well, in which case the difference is 0%) $x is always infinitely smaller (or infinitely larger if $y is negative) than $y.... the difference will always be more than 50% – Mark Baker Oct 25 '12 at 10:10
    
What is 0 + %50%? – bendataclear Oct 25 '12 at 10:16
1  
why do you divide by $x, shouldn't it be $y if you want to make the comparison with respect to $y ? – Istiaque Ahmed Oct 25 '12 at 10:30

If you want to find out ' if a value ($x) is 50% bigger or smaller than a value ($y).', then you should divide the difference by $y instead of $x. And when $y equals to zero, then any value (+ve or -ve) is infinitesimally larger or smaller than $y. No finite calculation is possible there.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure about dividing by $y? If I want to find out if $x is bigger/smaller than $y? – Hommer Smith Oct 25 '12 at 10:39
    
try to find out how much bigger in percentage is 10 than 5 ? – Istiaque Ahmed Oct 25 '12 at 10:41

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