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Ive spent hours trying to properly understand the use of getopt and getopt_long to parse particular command line arguments.

Basically, the command line will look only as follows:

my_project RR d in.file
my_project -m d FCFS in.file out.file
my_project -m d RR d1 in.file out.file

I cant seem to register true or false values in the following structs contained in my header file to register if a flag is in the command line.

Ive looked at the following example and cant seem to register a '1' in the cmd_lines struct to say a flag has been seen.

[http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Getopt-Long-Option-Example.html#Getopt-Long-Option-Example][1]

Here is my code below.

/**Command-line arguments**/
  `  struct cmd_line {`

        int rr;         /* rr option */
        int rr_q;       /* rr quantum option */
        int fcfs;       /* fcfs option */

    } cmd_lines;
    /**Options**/
    static const struct option longOpts[] = {
        { "FCFS", no_argument, NULL, 'f' },
        { "RR", required_argument, NULL, 'r' },
        {NULL, 0, NULL, 0}
    };

Main code below:

int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    //in = argv[1];
    int opt = 0;

    cmd_lines.rr = 0;
    cmd_lines.rr_q = 0;
    cmd_lines.fcfs = 0;
    //cmd_lines.inputFile = NULL;


    int longIndex = 0;
     //"abc:d:f:"

    while( ( opt = getopt_long( argc, argv, "fr:", longOpts, &longIndex )) != -1 )
    {
            switch( opt )
            {

                case 'f':
                    cmd_lines.fcfs = 1;
                    printf("%d\n",cmd_lines.fcfs);
                    break;

                case 'r':
                            cmd_lines.rr = 1; /* true */
                    //cmd_lines.rr_q = atoi(optarg);
                            break;

                        default:
                            break;  
            }

        //opt = getopt_long( argc, argv, "m:fr:", longOpts, &longIndex );
    }


    in = argv[argc - 1];



    if ( (input = fopen(in, "r") ) == NULL ) 
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot open input file or input file not specified\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }       




    parse_input();
    count_steps();

    if( cmd_lines.fcfs == 1 )
    {
        fcfs_output();
        fcfs_print();
    }
    else if( cmd_lines.rr == 1 )
    {
        RR_output(cmd_lines.rr_q);
        RR_print();
    }
    else
    {   
        fprintf(stderr, "No process algorithm specified. Scheduling halted.\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }




    fclose(input);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Any help regarding fixing this problem would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
'long' options are to be prefixed by --, so you might use --rr and --fcfs on the command line. Also those are case sensitive. –  alk Oct 25 '12 at 10:22
    
Ive made a few changes but still cant get the correct output –  DizzyChamp Oct 25 '12 at 10:25
    
Did you try using the command line options like this: my_project -m d --FCFS in.file out.file? –  alk Oct 25 '12 at 10:28
    
yes, it comes up with 'unrecognized option '--FCFS'' –  DizzyChamp Oct 25 '12 at 10:28
2  
There is no way using the getopt_long() interface as you wish. As it is explicilty focusing on using the -- prefix for long options. To have long options without this prefix you need to use a different option parser or build your own. –  alk Oct 25 '12 at 10:56

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