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Can anyone please help me with writing a Perl script which can take as input 5 text files and create a new text file with merging each row of all 5 files. Should this be done by opening 5 read streams at a time or like java some random file reader is available in Perl ?

Thank You!

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Yes, you can open 5 files at once (and far more than that) in Perl. Have you tried at all to solve this problem yourself? –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 10:31
    
Do you mean line1 of file1, line1 of file2,..., line2 of file1, line2 of file2... ? –  Guru Oct 25 '12 at 10:31
    
yes Guru, exactly I mean that. Yes dan1111, I tried but I doing something wrong. Will copy paste the code after clearing it up a bit. Thanks for responding. And my apologies for not posting my code with question. –  Andy897 Oct 25 '12 at 10:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This program expects a list of files on the command line (or, on Unix systems, a wildcard file spec). It creates an array of filehandles @fh for these files and then reads from each of them in turn, printing the merged data to STDOUT

use strict;
use warnings;

my @fh;
for (@ARGV) {
  open my $fh, '<', $_ or die "Unable to open '$_' for reading: $!";
  push @fh, $fh;
}

while (grep { not eof } @fh) {
  for my $fh (@fh) {
    if (defined(my $line = <$fh>)) {
      chomp $line;
      print "$line\n";
    }
  }
}
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If one of the files does not end with a newline, two lines will get merged into one at that point. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 11:27
    
Fixed. Thank you. –  Borodin Oct 25 '12 at 11:31
    
+1: grep { not eof } @fh is a nice improvement compared to what I had come up with. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 11:42

Here is a Perl script that will work on an arbitrary number of files:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @files = ('a.txt','b.txt');
my @fh;

#create an array of open filehandles.
@fh = map { open my $f, $_ or die "Cant open $_:$!"; $f } @files;

open my $out_file, ">merged.txt" or die "can't open out_file: $!";

my $output;
do
{
    $output = '';

    foreach (@fh)
    {
        my $line = <$_>;
        if (defined $line)
        {
            #Special case: might not be a newline at the end of the file
            #add a newline if none is found.
            $line .= "\n" if ($line !~ /\n$/);
            $output .= $line;
        }
    }

    print {$out_file} $output;
}
while ($output ne '');

a.txt:

foo1
foo2
foo3
foo4
foo5

b.txt:

bar1
bar2
bar3

merged.txt:

foo1
bar1
foo2
bar2
foo3
bar3
foo4
foo5
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1  
The $_= $f in your map call will replace all the file names in @files with their file handles so it will and up with the same data as in @fh. I assume you don't want that, so you should use just $f instead of assigning to $_ –  Borodin Oct 25 '12 at 11:10
    
@Borodin, thanks for catching that. Corrected. –  dan1111 Oct 25 '12 at 11:12

If a non-perl solution is ok with you, you can try this:

paste -d"\n\n\n\n\n" f1 f2 f3 f4 f5

where f1,f2..are your text files.

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What is this ? I did not get it –  Andy897 Oct 25 '12 at 10:43
    
@Andy897: paste is a POSIX standard utility program that does exactly what you are asking for –  ysth Oct 25 '12 at 11:00
    
@Guru: paste -d "\n" f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 is sufficient –  ysth Oct 25 '12 at 11:02
    
@ysth: thanks ysth :) –  Guru Oct 25 '12 at 11:55

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