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I recently tried to return an object of type Guid from a method accepting <T>, however the compiler gave me the following error:

The type 'System.Guid' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'MyGenericMethod'. There is no boxing conversion from 'System.Guid' to 'System.IConvertible'.

After investigation I realised that the compiler message was caused due to the Guid type not implementing the System.IConvertible interface.

MSDN states the following:

This interface provides methods to convert the value of an instance of an implementing type to a common language runtime type that has an equivalent value.

The provided list of types does not include Guid; Can anyone explain/provide a use case as to why this is the case?

share|improve this question
1  
What would a Guid mean in terms of any other type but a string? – leppie Oct 25 '12 at 10:47
1  
@leppie, quite a bit as a byte[] for storage as an Oracle Raw for example. – Justin Harvey Oct 25 '12 at 10:49
    
@JustinHarvey Nope, the SO editor took <T> and though it was some sort of tag. – Jamie Keeling Oct 25 '12 at 10:53
1  
It might indeed mean a lot as a byte[], but IConvertable only converts to the basic types, and that doesn't include byte[]. – Matthew Watson Oct 25 '12 at 10:55
    
@Jamie Keeling, can you also say what constraints you had on the generic, as you must have had some to genrate that error? – Justin Harvey Oct 25 '12 at 10:57
up vote 11 down vote accepted

IConvertible requires the type be able to convert it's data to most of the primitives. How would you represent a Guid as a float for example?

Because Guid cannot implement most of the interface methods it's expected to not declare itself otherwise.

Now on the real question: What are you trying to accomplish?

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense! Thanks for clearing it up for me, +1. – Jamie Keeling Oct 25 '12 at 11:09
1  
DateTime is an example of IConvertible almost all methods of which throw InvalidCastException. DBNull is even worse. – amartynov Jul 14 '14 at 9:58

Using System.Guid as type parameters for generic methods is not a problem as the following code shows. Can you please post the implementation of the MyGenericMethod method and also the code calling that method?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var test = new GenericTest();
        test.MyGenericMethod(Guid.NewGuid());
    }
}

class GenericTest
{
    public void MyGenericMethod<T>(T t)
    {
    }
}

I am guessing that the method implementation has a type constraint requiring the type parameter to be of IConvertible and therefore looks something like the following.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var test = new GenericTest();
        test.MyGenericMethod(Guid.NewGuid());
    }
}

class GenericTest
{
    public void MyGenericMethod<T>(T t)
        where T : IConvertible
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am guessing that the method implementation has a type constraint requiring the type parameter to be of IConvertible. Spot on! I had a look at the source (its an internal method) and noticed it required IConvertible, hence my compiler error. – Jamie Keeling Oct 25 '12 at 11:02

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