Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote this class in VC++, that is obviously non standard compliant(TBH seems retarded that it isnt allowed by the standard) so

1.) I would like to know how to convert it to standard C++11

code:

#include <functional>
template <typename T, typename U, typename T_to_U >
class MultiUnitValue  //Multi for now == 2 :)
{
    const T t;
    T_to_U conversion_function;
public:
    MultiUnitValue()    : t(0)
    {}
    MultiUnitValue(T t_): t(t_)
    {}
    template<typename V>
    V in() const
    {
        BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(0);// "you are trying to call in with type(unit) not supported"
    }
    template<>
    T in<T>() const
    {
        return t;
    }
    template<>
    U in<U>() const
    {
        return conversion_function(t);
    }


};

usage:

auto f = [](int i){return i*2.54;};

MultiUnitValue<int, float,decltype(f)> muv(10);
auto rv = muv.in<float>();

2.) I put BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT to prevent incorrect usage,
but it looks like MSVC doesnt instantiate it if not used(like I expect), but while trying to port it to g++4.7 it was firing even when the template wasnt instantiated? Replacing it with static_assert doesnt work... (why cant i have my poor man's concepts in g++ :( :P)

Any way to work around this?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you interesting in solution with variadic templates? I am asking, because VC++ still does not support this one of the nicest thing in C++11. –  PiotrNycz Oct 29 '12 at 10:11
    
I care about learning C++11 for the long term... in a sense that I care about learning C++11 and not worrying about how to hack around noncompliant compiler. BTW lets hope we will get VT in VS 2012 SP. :D –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 29 '12 at 10:30
1  
I added version with variadic templates as the main solution in my answer. –  PiotrNycz Oct 29 '12 at 11:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

Your solution was not "standard compliant", because member functions cannot be specialized in class template. This is because of general rule that functions cannot be partially specialized - so even "full" specialization of member function template is actually partial specialization because of not fully specialized class.


My solutions:

C++11 version

Your example with my version, I believe this is what you want:

int main(){
  auto f1 = [](int i){return i*2.54;};
  auto f2 = [](int i){ std::stringstream ss; ss << i; return ss.str(); };
  MultiUnitValue<int, float, std::string>  vv(1, f1, f2);
  std::cout << vv.in<int>() << "\n";
  std::cout << vv.in<float>() << "\n";
  std::cout << vv.in<std::string>() << "\n";
  // std::cout << vv.in<long>() << "\n"; // error to compile
}

First of all - you need the special conversion base classes, for a single conversion, you will see in next code fragment that calling conversion via base class function causes that "non specified" conversion, like this for long will not compile.

template <class T, class U>
class Conversion {
public:
    Conversion(const std::function<U(const T&)>& f) : f(f) {}
    U convert (const T& v) const { return f(v); }
private:
   std::function<U(const T&)>  f;
};
template <class T>
class Conversion<T,T> {
public:
    T convert (const T& v) const { return v; }
};

And your class with using variadic templates:

template <class T, class... V> // V... means all desired conversions
class MultiUnitValue : private Conversion<T,T>, private Conversion<T,V>... {
// allowed conversion:         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
public:
   MultiUnitValue(T v, const std::function<V(const T&)>&... f) : Conversion<T,V>(f)..., v(v) {}

   template <class U>
   U in() const
   {
      // this static assert is not needed - but just to show the message
      static_assert(std::is_base_of<Conversion<T,U>, MultiUnitValue<T,V...>>::value, 
                   "Not allowed conversion");

      // static_assert is not needed 
      // since if you MultiUnitValue does not derive from Conversion<T,U> 
      // - then this call will not compile too
      return this->Conversion<T,U>::convert(v);
   }

private:
   T v;
};

LVS example: http://liveworkspace.org/code/05b6ada146cc8f05d027a5536859a087

Version without variadic templates:

I also prepared solution without variadic templates, since VC++ still does not support them.

Second: the conversion and coversion limitation should be now in your T_to_U type.

With this approach usage will slightly inconvenient in the comparison to C++11 version:

int main(){
  auto f1 = [](int i){return i*2.54;};
  auto f2 = [](int i){ std::stringstream ss; ss << i; return ss.str(); };
  // next 2 lines differ from C++11 version
  typedef ConvertFunctions2<int, float, std::string> CF_f1_f2; 
  MultiUnitValue<int, CF_f1_f2>  vv(1, CF_f1_f2(f1, f2));
  std::cout << vv.in<int>() << "\n";
  std::cout << vv.in<float>() << "\n";
  std::cout << vv.in<std::string>() << "\n";
  // std::cout << vv.in<long>() << "\n"; // error to compile
}

The MultiUnitValue will be simpler than in your example, simpler even from my C++11 version, but the class CF will be much more complicated:

template <class T, class CF>
class MultiUnitValue {
public:
   MultiUnitValue(T v, const CF& cf) : v(v), cf(cf) {}

   template <class U>
   U in() const
   {
      return cf.Conversion<T,U>::convert(v);
   }

private:
   T v;
   CF cf;
};

The simple "helper" conversion classes will be identical as in C++11 version:

template <class T, class U>
class Conversion {
   ...
};
template <class T>
class Conversion<T,T> {
   ...
};

And the variadic template alternative in VC++ (and in old days of C++03):

template <class T>
class ConvertFunctions0 : public Conversion<T,T> {};

template <class T, class V1>
class ConvertFunctions1 : public Conversion<T,T>, public Conversion<T,V1> {
public:
  ConvertFunctions1(std::function<V1(const T&)> f1) : Conversion<T,V1>(f1) {}
};

template <class T, class V1, class V2>
class ConvertFunctions2 : public Conversion<T,T>, public Conversion<T,V1>, public Conversion<T,V2> {
public:
  ConvertFunctions2(std::function<V1(const T&)> f1, std::function<V2(const T&)> f2) 
  : Conversion<T,V1>(f1), Conversion<T,V2>(f2) 
  {}
};

As you can see - adding ConvertFunctions3, ConvertFunctions4 is not so big trouble...

Full example at ideone

share|improve this answer
    
MS just announced CTP of VS2012 compiler with VT support. :) –  NoSenseEtAl Nov 3 '12 at 15:44
    
I believe the pressure from developers were big enough:D C++11 is really big improvement, VS has its own additions to C++, but they just cannot ignore C++11... BTW, thanks for accepting. –  PiotrNycz Nov 3 '12 at 15:53

The first issue is that you can't specialize member function templates within a class, and you can't specialize them outside a (template) class because then they'd be partial function specializations. The easiest way to work around this is to use private member function overloads:

private:
    T in(T *) const { return t; }
    U in(U *) const { return conversion_function(t); }
    template<typename V> V in(V *) const {
        static_assert((V *)0, "you are trying to call in with type(unit) not supported");
    }
public:
    template<typename V> V in() const { return in((V *)0); }

This also demonstrates how to fix the issue with the static_assert always firing; you need to make its assertion expression dependent on a template parameter.

The next issue is that your template won't instantiate with a lambda type template parameter, because lambdas (even captureless lambdas) are not default-constructible. You can fix this by either going back to a traditional functor (struct with operator()) or convert the lambda type to a default-constructible type that calls the lambda.

One strategy is to indirect a void pointer when calling, since captureless lambdas shouldn't care what their this pointer is:

template<typename L> struct default_constructible_lambda {
  template<typename... Args> auto operator()(Args &&...args) const
    -> decltype(std::declval<L>()(std::forward<Args>(args)...)) {
      return (*(L *)(0))(std::forward<Args>(args)...); }
};
MultiUnitValue<int, float, default_constructible_lambda<decltype(f)>> muv(10);

This is still undefined behaviour, though; it's consistent with the standard for the lambda's function pointer to be stored within the closure type, in which case this would result in calling through a void pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
if you can try my code in VS 2010, auto rv = muv.in<float>(); returns expected result. –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 25 '12 at 12:28
    
@NoSenseEtAl I'm sure it does; it's still non-conformant code, though. –  ecatmur Oct 25 '12 at 12:38
    
I just tested it in VS 2012 RC, it works... maybe Herb could slip this into standard. :P –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 27 '12 at 17:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.