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I feel incredibly silly for having to ask this, but how do I work with return values?

For example, I have this code:

int x = 0;

void setup(){
  Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop(){
  int y = calc(x);
  Serial.println(y);

  delay(500);
}

int calc(int nmbr){
 int i = nmbr + 1;
 return i; 
}

How do I make it that x goes up? Basically, I want to see it go 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc, etc I know this is easily done with a for(), but I want to know how to work with return values, not how to create a counter.

The solution is probably very easy, and I'll facepalm when I see it, but I've been looking at my screen for the past 30 minutes and I'm completely stuck on this.

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2  
what do you mean by how to work with return values ? –  mux Oct 25 '12 at 11:41
    
well, how do I change x so it increases? Basically, x should change into the return value of calc() –  Cleverbird Oct 25 '12 at 11:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not changing x, you're changing another variable nmbr, because you're passing x by value, that is a copy of x, you could either pass it by reference, or since x is global you could just do this:

int calc() {
 return x++;
}

But really, you should just use a for loop :)

int x;
for (x=0; x<10; x++) {
  Serial.println(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know, I made this little bit of code just as an example. And I knew the solution would be easy, and I am indeed facepalming right now... Thank you good sir or madam! –  Cleverbird Oct 25 '12 at 11:51
    
you're welcome :) –  mux Oct 25 '12 at 11:52

Instead of declaring as int , you could have Declare static int .

#include <stdio.h>


void func() {
    static int x = 0; // x is initialized only once across three calls of func() and x will get incremented three 
                          //times after all the three calls. i.e x will be 2 finally
    printf("%d\n", x); // outputs the value of x
    x = x + 1;
}

int main() { //int argc, char *argv[] inside the main is optional in the particular program
    func(); // prints 0
    func(); // prints 1
    func(); // prints 2
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Mux's answer is good. I'll add some more varieties. First, just assign the function return value back to x:

loop() {
    x = calc( x );
    Serial.println( x );
}

Second, use call-by-reference, where you pass a pointer to x instead of the value of x.

void loop() {
    int y = calc( &x );
    Serial.println( y );
}

int calc( int *nmbr ) {
    *nmbr++;
}

It would really do you good to read "The C Programming Language" to get the hang of the language and its possibilities. Good luck :-)

Cheers,

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Try:

int y = 0;

void setup(){
  Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop(){
  y = calc(y);
  Serial.println(y);

  delay(500);
}

int calc(int nmbr){
 int i = nmbr + 1;
 return i; 
}
share|improve this answer

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