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If I call a method on a rails active model method like so:

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base

end

Foo.first

I'll get back the first active record. I don't have to instantiate the class.

But if I create my own class and call a method, I get an exception:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def greeting
    'hello'
  end
end

Person.greeting 

#EXCEPTION: undefined method `greeting' for Person:Class

How can I make that problem go away?

share|improve this question
    
FYI, what you have seems like it should almost definitely not be in the model, and instead be in the view or a helper. –  Andrew Marshall Oct 25 '12 at 11:52
    
My real world example does something with the data :) –  Rimian Oct 25 '12 at 11:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are several kinds of methods. The two most important ones are: instance methods and class instance methods.

Foo.first is a class instance method. It works on a class instance (Foo, in this case). If it stores some data inside the class, that data is shared globally across your program (because there's only one class with name Foo (or ::Foo, to be exact)).

But your greeting method is an instance method, it requires object instance. If your greeting method will use Person's name, for example, it has to be instance method, so that it will be able to use instance data (the name). If it doesn't use any instance-specific state and you really meant it to be a class instance method, then use the self "prefix".

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.greeting
    'hello'
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Of course! Now I can remember it. –  Rimian Oct 25 '12 at 11:53

Try class methods:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.greeting
    'hello'
  end
end

Or another syntax:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  class << self
    def greeting
      'hello'
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that! –  Rimian Oct 25 '12 at 11:47
class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
    def self.greeting
      'hello'
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this also! –  Rimian Oct 25 '12 at 11:48

To do a static method try this:

class MyModel
    def self.do_something
        puts "this is a static method"
    end
end

MyModel.do_something  # => "this is a static method"
MyModel::do_something # => "this is a static method"

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1  
Except, you know, there are no static methods in ruby :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Oct 25 '12 at 11:52
class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  def Person.greeting
    'hello'
  end
end

Will work too. I like it because it is very clear what it does; it will result in an error when you decide to rename the Person class however.

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