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Hello I have just started doing some parsing in bison/yacc. Now my first program already fails. What went wrong? I am using an example from: original source of tutorial

%{
    #include <stdio.h>
    int yylex(void);
    void yyerror(char *);
%}


%token INTEGER

%%

program:
        program expr '\n'         { printf("%d\n", $2); }
        | 
        ;

expr:
        INTEGER                   { $$ = $1; }
        | expr '+' expr           { $$ = $1 + $3; }
        | expr '-' expr           { $$ = $1 - $3; }
        ;

%%

void yyerror(char *s) {
    fprintf(stderr, "%s\n", s);
}

int main(void) {
    yyparse();
    return 0;
}

Using version 2.4.1 of bison I get this error:

conflicts: 4 shift/reduce
share|improve this question
    
AIX Documentation of yacc Explaints my problem. My grammar is ambigous –  elcojon Oct 25 '12 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try that:

expr:
    INTEGER                   { $$ = $1; }
    | expr '+' INTEGER           { $$ = $1 + $3; }
    | expr '-' INTEGER           { $$ = $1 - $3; }

bison/yacc don't like right recursion. If the input is 1+2+3, when the parser reaches 1+2+ it can't decide either to reduce 1+2 to expr or to shift another token in order to reduce 2+3 to expr. By specifying INTEGER on the right, it can decide to reduce as soon as it sees 1+2 leaving only expr + 3 then reducing again.

You can also solve the issue by specifying that + and - are left associative, thus giving a higher priority to reducing 1+2 over shifting new tokens. Add that line in your preamble:

%left '+' '-'

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. I had just figured it out by myself. It makes things even more clear to me. –  elcojon Oct 25 '12 at 12:31
1  
Bison has no problem with right recursion. If you wanted a right-associative = operator, you could use expr : INTEGER '=' expr;; that's fine. The problem is when you have expr on both sides; then the grammar is ambiguous. As you say, you can resolve the ambiguity with precedence declarations. –  rici Oct 25 '12 at 16:30
    
"Not liking right-recursion" is irrelevant here. They support both, but prefer left-recursion when stack space is a concern (not the case here). The problem here is that the grammar is ambiguous, and does not say if "1-2-3" is "(1-2)-3" or "1-(2-3)". Of course, %left '-' is the right to do, but it has nothing to do with Bison's liking it or not. –  akim Oct 26 '12 at 7:45
    
I remarked the OP was "starting" to use yacc and I said 'like' to try to give him a simple rule to follow which would work in 90% of all use cases. –  fjardon Oct 26 '12 at 9:21

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