Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to compile java code that uses some Java's deprecated "sun" packages and Gradle compile task fails with this error

error: package com.sun.xml.internal.ws.developer does not exist

I am using Hotspot JDK and I can see this package there (so it actually exists - in rt.jar file) I also tried to add rt.jar itself into Gradle dependencies:

compile files( 'C:/Program Files/Java/jdk1.7.0_05/jre/lib/rt.jar')

but with no effect

here is my gradle -v output:

------------------------------------------------------------
Gradle 1.2
------------------------------------------------------------

Gradle build time: Streda, 2012, september 12 10:46:02 UTC
Groovy: 1.8.6
Ant: Apache Ant(TM) version 1.8.4 compiled on May 22 2012
Ivy: 2.2.0
JVM: 1.7.0_05 (Oracle Corporation 23.1-b03)
OS: Windows 7 6.1 amd64

I also tried to add jaxws-rt.jar to classpath - no effect neither

I would really appreciate any help

thanks

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by duffymo, César Bustíos, Ryan, j0k, J. Kommer Oct 25 '12 at 18:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It may be that those packages are no longer part of JDK 7 on AMD64. –  duffymo Oct 25 '12 at 12:03
    
no, when I unzip rt.jar, I can it there –  user1746915 Oct 25 '12 at 12:08
    
Then it should be in the CLASSPATH. –  duffymo Oct 25 '12 at 12:12
    
no, it is in classpath - compile files( 'C:/Program Files/Java/jdk1.7.0_05/jre/lib/rt.jar') –  user1746915 Oct 25 '12 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's Oracle's intent that these classes be inaccessible at compile-time.

See the response to this javac bug report.

For a likely solution, see Using internal sun classes with javac . The javac -XDignore.symbol.file switch should fix this - but I'm a gradle newb, and don't see how to feed this to gradle's JavaCompile. My best guess is

  apply plugin: 'java' 
  compileJava.options.useAnt = true 
  compileJava.options.compilerArgs << "-XDignore.symbol.file" 

Incidentally, ct.sym (referred to in the link) appears to be a jar-file that lists, as class stubs, all the accessible classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Gradle doesn't use a class loader for this, and it doesn't exclude anything. It just invokes the Java compiler API with all available information (e.g. compile class path). I believe it's the Java compiler (API) that disallows usage of certain internal JDK packages. Here is a reported case where explicitly adding rt.jar solved the problem: forums.gradle.org/gradle/topics/… –  Peter Niederwieser Oct 25 '12 at 12:53
    
Peter: I tried it on a new project (to make sure I did not reuse my old mistakes) and it still does not work :( –  user1746915 Oct 25 '12 at 13:25
    
also when I build my project in Idea, it works –  user1746915 Oct 25 '12 at 13:29
    
@PeterNiederwieser - thanks for showing the way - see updated answer with specifics, and (hopefully) a partial better solution. I cross-posted onto the forum thread in hope that it's useful. –  Ed Staub Oct 25 '12 at 13:39
    
@user1746915 - IDE's do all sort of tricks with the compiler. If you're trying to come at this from a neutral perspective, to confirm that gradle isn't causing the problem, try compiling a tiny .java with the problem import from the command line. –  Ed Staub Oct 25 '12 at 14:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.