Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which is more efficient in Java: to check for bad values to prevent exceptions or let the exceptions happen and catch them?

Here are two blocks of sample code to illustrate this difference:

void doSomething(type value1) {
    ResultType result = genericError;

     if (value1 == badvalue || value1 == badvalue2 || ...) {
          result = specificError;
     } else {
          DoSomeActionThatFailsIfValue1IsBad(value1);
          // ...
          result = success;
     }
     callback(result);
}

versus

void doSomething(type value1) {
     ResultType result = genericError;
     try {
          DoSomeActionThatFailsIfValue1IsBad(value1);
          // ...
          result = success;
     } catch (ExceptionType e) {
          result = specificError;
     } finally {
          callback(result);
     }
}

On the one hand, you're always doing a comparison. On the other hand, I honestly don't know what the internals of the system do to generate an exception, throw it, and then trigger the catch clause. It has the sound of being less efficient, but if it doesn't add overhead in the non-error case, then it's more efficient, on average. Which is it? Does it add similar checking anyway? Is that checking there in the implicit code added for exception handling, even with the additional layer of explicit checking? Perhaps it always depends on the type of exception? What am I not considering?

Let's also assume that all "bad values" are known -- that's an obvious issue. If you don't know all the bad values -- or the list is too long and not regular -- then exception handling may be the only way, anyway.

So, what are the pros and cons of each, and why?

Side questions to consider:

  • How does your answer change if the value is "bad" (would throw an exception) most of the time?
  • How much of this would depend on the specifics of the VM in use?
  • If this same question was asked for language-X, would the answer be different? (Which, more generally, is asking if it can be assumed checking values is always more efficient than relying on exception handling simply because it adds more overhead by current compilers/interpreters.)
  • (New) The act of throwing an exception is slow. Does entering a try block have overhead, even if an exception is not thrown?


Similarities on SO:

  • This is similar to the code sample in this answer, but states they are similar only in concept, not compiled reality.
  • The premise is similar to this question but, in my case, the requester of the task (e.g. "Something") isn't the caller of the method (e.g. "doSomething") (thus no returns).
  • And this one is very similar, but I didn't find an answer to my question.

  • And similar to far too many other questions to list, except:

    I'm not asking about theoretical best practice. I'm asking more about runtime performance and efficiency (which should mean, for specific cases, there are non-opinion answers), especially on resource limited platforms. For instance, if the only bad value was simply a null object, would it be better/more efficient to check for that or just attempt to use it and catch the exception?

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for all the input so far. Up to now, the general consensus seems to be that a frequent bad value should be checked for to prevent an exception, but other case (truly exceptional cases) can just be caught and adding "try" to a block should be very efficient. In which case, a hybrid solution is often best for generic situations. (Clean inputs = exceptions. Random inputs = hybrid. Always bad? Go flog the caller/requester .. no, wait, that can't be right...) –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 22:53
add comment

11 Answers 11

"How does your answer change if the value is "bad" (would throw an exception) most of the time?" I think that's the key right there. Exceptions are expensive as compared to comparisons, so you really want to use exceptions for exceptional conditions.

Similarly, your question about how this answer might change depending on the language/environment ties into that: The expense of exceptions is different in different environments. .Net 1.1 and 2.0 are incredibly slow the first time an exception is thrown, for instance.

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting. And I added a follow-up question, to, about just the presence of a try block. Thanks for the info. –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 15:18
    
I read that the cost of try is minimal (and that makes sense to my intuition.) –  djna Aug 20 '09 at 15:33
    
@djna: That makes sense to me, too. But minimal isn't zero, either, and if comparing to a simple integer check (for example), it might be a wash. Then again, that sort of efficiency difference would only really matter in certain situations. Knowing, though, is half the battle. –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 15:40
    
@lilbyrdie: I believe the cost of entering a try block on most platforms is trivial. –  T.J. Crowder Aug 20 '09 at 15:44
1  
Implementors generally make the cost of entering a try block as small as possible, even if it slows down the actual throw. (After all, the try block will be entered many more times than it throws, or so goes the assumption.) –  David Thornley Aug 20 '09 at 16:14
add comment

Purely from an efficiency standpoint, and given your code examples, I think it depends on how often you expect to see bad values. If bad values are not too uncommon, it's faster to do the comparison because exceptions are expensive. If bad values are very rare, however, it may be faster to use the exception.

The bottom line, though, is that if you're looking for performance, profile your code. This block of code may not even be a concern. If it is, then try it both ways and see which is faster. Again, it depends on how often you expect to see bad values.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I could find surprisingly little current information about the cost of throwing Exceptions. Pretty obviously there must be some, you are creating an object, and probably getting stack trace information.

In the specific example you talk about:

if (value1 == badvalue || value1 == badvalue2 || ...) {
      result = specificError;
 } else {
      DoSomeActionThatFailsIfValue1IsBad(value1);
      // ...
      result = success;
 }

The problem for me here is that you are in danger if (probably incompletely) replicating logic in the caller that should be owned by the method you are calling.

Hence I would not perform those checks. Your code is not performing an experiment, it does "know" the data it's supposed to be sending down I suppose? Hence the likelyhood of the Exception being thrown should be low. Hence keep it simple, let the callee do the checks.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good point about replicating logic, although I hadn't meant to imply that it was always yet another method call. Still, there's no certainty (unless it's your own method) that the method being called checks the values (one could hope, but making that assumption in this example could lead to errors or exceptions being thrown). –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 15:33
add comment

In my opinion you should have try/catch blocks around anything that could potentially throw exceptions, if only to have a safe running system. You have finer control of error responses if you check for possible data errors fist. So I suggest doing both.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My personal opinion is that exceptions indicate that something is broken - this might well be an API called with illegal arguments or division by zero or file not found etc. This means that exceptions could be thrown by checking values.

For the reader of your code - again my personal opinion - it is much easier to follow the flow if you can be certain that it is not put aside by all kinds of strange throws (which is essentially gotos in disguise if used as part of the program flow). You simply have less to think about.

This is in my opinion a good thing. "Smart" code is hard to wrap your head around.

On a side note - JVM's get much much smarter - coding for efficiency usually doesn't pay off.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Normally, one would assume that try-catch is more expensive because it looks heavier in the code, but that entirely depends on the JIT. My guess is that it's impossible to tell without having a real case and some performance measurements. The comparisons could be more expensive, especially when you have many values, for example, or because you have to call equals() since == won't work in many cases.

As for which one you should chose (as in "code style"), my answer is: Make sure that the user gets a useful error message when it fails. Anything else is a matter of taste and I can't give you rules for that.

share|improve this answer
add comment

To be safe, assume exceptions are expensive. They often are, and if they aren't it will at least push you towards using exceptions wisely. (Entering a try block is usually trivially cheap, since implementors do their best to make it so, even at the cost of making exceptions more expensive. After all, if exceptions are used properly, the code will enter the try block many times more often than it will throw.)

More importantly, exceptions are a style issue. Exceptions for exceptional conditions make code simpler because there's less error-checking code, so the actual functionality is clearer and more compact.

However, if exceptions might be thrown in more normal circumstances, there's invisible flows of control that the reader has to keep in mind, comparable to Intercal's COME FROM...UNLESS... statement. (Intercal was one of the very early joke languages.) This is very confusing, and can easily lead to misreading and misunderstanding the code.

My advice, which applies to every language and environment I know about:

Don't worry about efficiency here. There are strong reasons besides efficiency for using exceptions in a way that will prove efficient.

Use try blocks freely.

Use exceptions for exceptional conditions. If an exception is likely, test for it and handle it in another way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

a question like this is like asking,

"is it more efficient to write an interface or a base class with all abstract functions"

does it matter which is more efficient? only one of them is the right way for a given situation

share|improve this answer
    
In many situations, it does matter which is more efficient. And, when the coding difficulty is essentially the same, and both solutions work (thus, they both could be right for a given situation), the most efficient would be best. After all, why not do something efficient if it's just as easy -- if not easier -- to code? What I didn't know -- and have MUCH more information now -- is the implications of choosing one style over another. –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 22:43
add comment

Well, exceptions are more expensive, yes but for me, its about weighting the cost of efficiency vs bad design. unless your use case demands it, always stick to the best design.

the question really is, when do you throw an exception? in exceptional situations.

if your arguments are not in the range that you're looking for, i'd suggest returning an error code or a boolean.

for instance, a method,

public int IsAuthenticated(String username, String password)
{

     if(!Validated(username,password)
     {
          // just an error
          // log it
          return -2;   
     }

     // contacting the Database here
     if cannot connect to db
     {
          // woww this is HUUGE
          throw new DBException('cannot connect'); // or something like that
     }

     // validate against db here
     if validated, return 0;

    // etc etc

}

thats my 2 cents

share|improve this answer
    
That's great design, I especially admire the "cannot connect" argument to the DBException :) –  vehomzzz Aug 20 '09 at 20:10
    
Unfortunately, this misses the original point of comparing efficiency/performance of preventing exceptions versus handling them. This is comparing different ways of checking for errors and returning them. Although a valid discussion, my real world scenario can't throw or return errors from the method -- it has to make a call in response -- which is why I needed to handle all cases and block typical errors from going up (but I can't do anything about VM errors, etc.) –  lilbyrdie Aug 20 '09 at 22:40
add comment

Note that if your code doesn't throw exceptions then it doesn't always imply that the input is within bounds. Relying on throwing exceptions by the standard Java (API + JVM), such as NullPointerException or ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsExceptions is a very unhealthy way to validate input. Garbage-in sometimes generates garbage-but-no-exception-out.

And yes, exceptions are quite expensive. They should not be thrown during a normal processing flow.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Optimizationally, I think you're going to find it's probably a wash. They'll both perform alright, I don't think exception throwing is ever going to be your bottleneck. You should probably be more concerned with what Java is designed to do (and what other Java programmers will expect) and that is thrown exceptions. Java is very much designed around throwing/catching exceptions and you can bet the designers made that process as efficient as possible.

I think it's mostly a philosophy and language culture sort of thing. In Java, the general accepted practice is that the method signature is a contract between your method and the code calling it. So if you receive an improper value, you generally throw an unchecked exception and let it be dealt with at a higher level:

public void setAge(int age)
{
    if(age < 0)
    {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Array can't be negative");
    }

    this.age = age;
}

In this case, the caller broke their end of the contract, so you spit their input back at them with an exception. The "throws" clause is for use when you can't fulfill your end of the contract for some reason.

public void readFile(String filename) throws IOException
{
   File myfile = new File(filename);
   FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(myfile);

   //do stuff

   fis.read();

   //do more stuff
}

In this case, as the method writer, you've broken your end of the contract because the user gave you valid input, but you couldn't complete their request due to an IOException.

Hope that kinda puts you on the right track. Good luck!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.