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Assume there is a need to implement getters/setters (also I try to avoid them whenever possible because they often indicate bad design). Which variant of the following two is better and what are the implications of each?

Possibility (1):

class Foo;
class Bar
{
public:
    const Foo& getFoo() const {return foo_;}
private:
    Foo foo_;
};

or (2):

class Foo;
class Bar
{
public:
    void getFoo(Foo& foo) const {foo = foo_}
private:
    Foo foo_;
};

Personally, I use always the first variant, because I find it more intuitive. In the second variant you have to construct the Foo object, which will hold the result of getFoo, before calling getFoo and then pass getFoo a reference to this object. This variant feels counterintuitive to me, but there are people, who prefer the secodn variant. For what reason might be the second variant superior to the first one?

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11  
I'm going to go on a hunch and say "none". Have you considered Foo const& getFoo() const? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 25 '12 at 12:46
1  
And add to that Foo& getFoo() if you want the behavior of the second version w.r.t. mutability of your reference (note that technically your 2 is not const-conformant and you would have to apply this trick anyway). –  gha.st Oct 25 '12 at 12:50
1  
Am I the only one confused about getters and setters being indicative of a bad design? –  Mitch Oct 25 '12 at 13:04
    
@Mitch Yes, I think, that in many cases the use of getters/setters indicates bad design, because they break encapsulation. But, of course, there are situation where you need them. –  MWid Oct 25 '12 at 13:10
    
@Mitch: getters and setters are bad design if they reveal details of the implementation of the class. It's a rather touchy subject, and we could have a lengthy discussion on this. But basically, whenever I see getters and setters, the first thing to ask: are they really necessary? –  Zane Oct 25 '12 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Output arguments should be considered criminal offence. It's more difficult to use, but especially much more difficult to maintain, because it's just not visible in the code. If something is assigned to, it's clear. If a method is invoked on object, it's kind of expected it might modify it. But if it's only passed to a function, normal maintenance programmer won't suspect it's being modified. Plus most of the time it requires extra line for declaring a temporary variable to accept the value.

This kind of thing is mainly written by people who stopped at C89 and somehow learned C++ syntax. But with C++ copy elision and move semantics of C++11 I don't see any valid reason worth making the code more difficult to read.

Of course if you are returning a member, you can return const reference to it. If the value is computed, just return by value and copy elision will take care of it most of the time.

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First variant is of course preferable in general case. Due to Return Value Optimization (RVO) it is not less effective than second as returned object is not copied and there is no performance overhead.

Second variant could be preferable if you need to have some preliminary setup on passed object or use some partial copy. But this is not trivial getter anymore, of course, but some different function with different semantics.

Another possible reason to use second variant - when passed object could not be created directly by the holding class, e.g. its creation is encapsulated by some factory and you don't want to make your class dependent on this factory.

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const Foo& getFoo() const {return foo_;}
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