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It is supposed to evaluate e^pi - pi.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;
long double Pie();
long double Factorial(double n);
long double E();

int main()
{
    long double answer = pow(E(),Pie()) - Pie();
    cout << setprecision(20);
    cout << answer;

    return 0;
}
long double Pie()
{
    long double a = 1;
    long double b = (1 / sqrtl(2));
    long double t = (1.0 / 4.0);
    long double p = 1;

    long double aPlaceholder;
    for (int i = 1; i < 5; i++)
    {
        aPlaceholder = a;
        a = (a + b) / 2;
        b = sqrtl(aPlaceholder * b);
        t = t - p * (aPlaceholder - a) * (aPlaceholder - a);
        p = 2 * p;
    }
    long double nicePie;
    nicePie = (a + b) * (a + b) / (4 * t);
    return nicePie;
}

long double E()
{
    long double e = 0;
    for(double i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    e += 1.0 / Factorial(i);
    return e;
}

long double Factorial(double n)
{
    if(n == 0)
    return 1;
    int i = n - 1;
    while (i > 0)
    {
      n *= i;
      i--;
    }
    return n;
}

The scenario is that I want to evaluate e, raise it to the power of pi, and then subtract pi from the result and then print the answer to the screen. Another aspect to the scenario is that this is a basic C++ program.

share|improve this question
    
The first thing, that comes to my mind - execute Pie only once and store its value, then pass it in the calculation of answer. –  Kiril Kirov Oct 25 '12 at 12:55
    
Are Pie and E always the same? If so (and it looks like this) - why don't you precompute them and directly use them? It's not very clear what you're trying to achieve. –  Kiril Kirov Oct 25 '12 at 12:56
4  
What's wrong with exp(atan(1)*4) - atan(1)*4? –  Henrik Oct 25 '12 at 12:57
1  
The first thing that comes to my mind is why calculate Pi at all, why not just either get the value from a library or simply declare a constant pie = 3.1415926535... –  High Performance Mark Oct 25 '12 at 12:58
    
I'm not sure how much this will matter, but try initializing your double as long double e(0.0); –  andre Oct 25 '12 at 13:05

2 Answers 2

That being said there is some calculus in your code that you do multiple times while it is not needed:

  • Pie is called twice.
  • In E(), Factorial is called at every iteration while you could multiply the previous result with i.

.

long double E()
{
  long double e = 0;
  long double fact_i = 1;
  for(double i = 1; i < 20; i++)
  {
    fact_i *= i;
    e += 1.0 / fact_i;
  }
  return e;
}
share|improve this answer

cmath provides π and e as predefined constants as M_PI and M_E accurate within the precision of double, but it's not mandatory by C++ standard.

You can just do double pi = acos(-1);

share|improve this answer
    
It undoubtedly does in some implementations, but it's not required by standard C++ and its inclusion is nowhere close to universal. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 25 '12 at 13:24

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