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I have a table with entity name, year and activity number as bellow. During some years there is not any activity.

name | year | act_num
-----+------+---------
aa   | 2000 |       2
aa   | 2001 |       6
aa   | 2002 |       9
aa   | 2003 |      15
aa   | 2005 |      17
b    | 2000 |       3
b    | 2002 |       4
b    | 2003 |       9
b    | 2005 |      12
b    | 2006 |       2

To create it on postgresql;

CREATE TABLE entity_year_activity (
name character varying(10),
year integer,
act_num integer
);

INSERT INTO entity_year_activity
VALUES
    ('aa', 2000, 2),
    ('aa', 2001, 6),
    ('aa', 2002, 9),
    ('aa', 2003, 15),
    ('aa', 2005, 17),
    ('b', 2000, 3),
    ('b', 2002, 4),
    ('b', 2003, 9),
    ('b', 2005, 12),
    ('b', 2006, 2);

I would like to have the total number of the past x years with the number of this year activities for each entity for every year as bellow.

As an example for x = three years.

name | year | act_num | total_3_years
-----+------+---------+---------------
aa   | 2000 |       2 |      2
aa   | 2001 |       6 |      8
aa   | 2002 |       9 |     17
aa   | 2003 |      15 |     30
aa   | 2004 |       0 |     24
aa   | 2005 |      17 |     32
b    | 2000 |       3 |      3
b    | 2001 |       0 |      3
b    | 2002 |       4 |      7
b    | 2003 |       9 |     13
b    | 2005 |      12 |     21
b    | 2006 |       2 |     14
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2  
Great question. Sample data, expected output, DDL. It's worth noting that Stack Overflow doesn't preserve tabs, though, so your COPY output got mangled. Better to use COPY ... CSV. –  Craig Ringer Oct 25 '12 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's an approach that uses the ability to use the sum aggregate as a window function with a range-based window frame - see SUM(...) OVER (PARTITION BY name ORDER BY year ROWS 2 PRECEDING) and window framing.

WITH name_years(gen_name, gen_year) AS (
  SELECT gen_name, s
  FROM generate_series(
    (SELECT min(year) FROM entity_year_activity),
    (SELECT max(year) FROM entity_year_activity)
  ) s CROSS JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT name FROM entity_year_activity) n(gen_name)
),
windowed_history(name, year,act_num,last3_actnum) AS (
  SELECT
    gen_name, gen_year, coalesce( act_num, 0),
    SUM(coalesce(act_num,0)) OVER (PARTITION BY gen_name ORDER BY gen_year ROWS 2 PRECEDING)
  FROM name_years 
  LEFT OUTER JOIN entity_year_activity ON (gen_name = name AND gen_year = year)
)
SELECT name, year, act_num, sum(last3_actnum) as total_3_years
FROM windowed_history
GROUP BY name, year, act_num
HAVING sum(last3_actnum) <> 0
ORDER BY name, year;

See SQLFiddle.

The need to generate entries for years that have no entry themselves complicates this query. I generate a table of all (name, year) pairs, then left outer join entity_year_activity on it before doing the window sum, so all years for all name sets are represented. That's why this is so complicated. Then I filter the aggregated result to exclude entries with zero in the sum.

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This also doesn't skip the missing year, so it is not correct. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 25 '12 at 13:37
    
@GordonLinoff ... hence "yet". –  Craig Ringer Oct 25 '12 at 13:41
    
@GordonLinoff Updated –  Craig Ringer Oct 25 '12 at 13:47

Another try. This one lacks the 0 row years, though:

select t1.name, t1.year, t1.act_num,
      (select sum(t2.act_num) from entity_year_activity t2
                              where t2.year between t1.year - 2 and t1.year
                                    and t2.name = t1.name) total
from entity_year_activity t1;
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SQL Fiddle

select
    s.name,
    d "year",
    coalesce(act_num, 0) act_num,
    coalesce(act_num, 0)
    + lag(coalesce(act_num, 0), 1, 0) over(partition by s.name order by d)
    + lag(coalesce(act_num, 0), 2, 0) over(partition by s.name order by d)
    total_3_years
from
    entity_year_activity eya
    right join (
        generate_series(
            (select min("year") from entity_year_activity),
            (select max("year") from entity_year_activity)
        ) d cross join (
        select distinct name
        from entity_year_activity
        ) f
    ) s on s.name = eya.name and s.d = eya."year"
order by s.name, d
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work, because it does not skip years with no data. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 25 '12 at 13:27
    
@GordonLinoff New version does. –  Clodoaldo Neto Oct 25 '12 at 13:38
SELECT en_key.name, en_key.year, en_key.act_num, SUM(en_sum.act_num) as total_3_years
FROM entity_year_activity en_key
  INNER JOIN entity_year_activity en_sum
     ON en_key.name = en_sum.name
WHERE en_sum.year BETWEEN en_key.year - 2 AND en_key.year
GROUP BY en_key.name, en_key.year
share|improve this answer
    
If you fix this by moving the where clause into the on clause and removing en_key.year = en_sum.year, then it will work. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 25 '12 at 13:29
    
Edited to remove the en_key.year = en_sum.year. That does defeat the purpose. I'm not sure if the where clause needs to be moved to the on clause. I think it would work either way. Stylistically, I didn't see it as part of the join, but rather a condition on the report. I expect it is a matter of opinion and preference. –  Marlin Pierce Oct 25 '12 at 13:43
    
. . As a general practice, join conditions should go in the on clause, so aethetically it belongs there rather than in the where clause. However, the performance of the two versions should be the same. –  Gordon Linoff Oct 25 '12 at 14:00
    
Yeah, but I'm saying it's not a join condition, it's a regular where condition. Or rather that if it is a join condition or not is an opinion. –  Marlin Pierce Oct 25 '12 at 17:06

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