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I'm new to Backbone.js, and someone who comes out of the 'standard' model of JS development I'm a little unsure of how to work with the models (or when).

Views seem pretty obvious as it emulates the typical 'listen for event and do something' method that most JS dev's are familiar with.

I built a simple Todo list app and so far haven't seen a need for the model aspect so I'm curious if someone can give me some insight as to how I might apply it to this application, or if it's something that comes into play if I were working with more complex data.

Here's the JS:

Todos = (function(){

    var TodoModel = Backbone.Model.extend({

      defaults: {
          content: null
      }

    });

    var TodoView = Backbone.View.extend({

      el: $('#todos'),
      newitem: $('#new-item input'),
      noitems: $('#no-items'),

      initialize: function(){
        this.el = $(this.el);
      },

      events: {
        'submit #new-item': 'addItem',
        'click .remove-item': 'removeItem'
      },

      template: $('#item-template').html(),

      addItem: function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        this.noitems.remove();
        var templ = _.template(this.template);
        this.el.append(templ({content: this.newitem.val()}));
        this.newitem.val('').focus();
        return this;
      },

      removeItem: function(e){
        $(e.target).parent('.item-wrap').remove();
      }

  });

  self = {};
  self.start = function(){
    new TodoView();
  };
  return self;

});

$(function(){

    new Todos(jQuery).start();

});

Which is running here: http://sandbox.fluidbyte.org/bb-todo

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Model and Collection are needed when you have to persist the changes to the server.

Example:

var todo = new TodoModel();

creates a new model. When you have to save the save the changes, call

todo.save();

You can also pass success and error callbacks to save . Save is a wrapper around the ajax function provided by jQuery.

How to use a model in your app.

Add a url field to your model

var TodoModel = Backbone.Model.extend({

  defaults: {
      content: null
  },
  url: {
      "http://localhost";  
  }

});

Create model and save it.

addItem: function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        this.noitems.remove();
        var templ = _.template(this.template);
        this.el.append(templ({content: this.newitem.val()}));
        this.newitem.val('').focus();
        var todo = new TodoModel({'content':this.newitem.val()});
        todo.save();
        return this;
      },

Make sure your server is running and set the url is set correctly.

Learning Resources:

  • Check out the annotated source code of Backbone for an excellent explanation of how things fall into place behind the scenes.
  • This Quora question has links to many good resources and sample apps.
share|improve this answer
1  
Ok, that seems logical. So the code would create the todo using the model structure, then pass it to the url. Simple enough. –  Fluidbyte Oct 25 '12 at 15:29

The model is going to be useful if you ever want to save anything on the server side. Backbone's model is built around a RESTful endpoint. So if for example you set URL root to lists and then store the list information in the model, the model save and fetch methods will let you save/receive JSON describing the mode to/from the server at the lists/<id> endpoint. IE:

   ToDoListModel = Backbone.model.extend( {
         urlRoot : "lists/" } );

   // Once saved, lives at lists/5
   list = new ToDoListModel({id: 5, list: ["Take out trash", "Feed Dog"] });
   list.save();

So you can use this to interact with data that persists on the server via a RESTful interface. see this tutorial for more.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking about using localStorage as the mechanism to maintain data, would that be a good use-case for model? –  Fluidbyte Oct 25 '12 at 13:40
1  
Backbone itself doesn't support local storage but there are plugins that do such as: github.com/jeromegn/Backbone.localStorage –  InPursuit Oct 25 '12 at 14:32
    
Yup, that's what I'm planning on using. So, does it make sense to keep commands for setting/getting LocalStorage in the view, or put it in the model? –  Fluidbyte Oct 25 '12 at 15:19

I disagree with the idea that model is needed only to persist changes (and I am including LocalStorage here, not only the server).

It is nice to have representation of models and collections so that you have object to work with and not only Views. In your example you are only adding and removing divs (html) from the page, which is something you can do normally with jQuery. Having a Model created and added to a Collection everytime you do "add" and maybe removed when you clear it will allow you some nice things, like for example sorting (alphabetically), or filtering (if you want to implement the concept of "complete" to-do).

In your code, for example:

var TodoModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults: {
        content: null
        complete: false
    }
});

var Todos = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: TodoModel
})

In the View (irrelevant code is skipped):

// snip....
addItem: function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    this.noitems.remove();
    var templ = _.template(this.template);
    var newTodo = new TodoModel({ content: this.newitem.val() });
    this.collection.add(newTodo); // you get the collection property from free from the initializer in Backbone
    this.el.append(templ({model: newTodo})); // change the template here of course to use model
    this.newitem.val('').focus();
    return this;
},

Initialize like this:

self.start = function(){
    new TodoView(new Todos());
};

Now you have a backing Collection and you can do all sort of stuff, like filtering. Let's say you have a button for filtering done todos, you hook this handler:

_filterDone: function (ev) {
    filtered = this.collection.where({ complete: true });
    this.el.html(''); // empty the collection container, I used "el" but you know where you are rendering your todos
    _.each(filtered, function (todo) {
        this.el.append(templ({model: todo})); // it's as easy as that! :)
    });
}

Beware that emptying the container is probably not the best thing if you have events hooked to the inner views but as a starter this works ok.

You may need a hook for setting a todo done. Create a button or checkbox and maybe a function like this:

_setDone: function (ev) {
    // you will need to scope properly or "this" here will refer to the element clicked!
    todo = this.collection.get($(ev.currentTarget).attr('todo_id')); // if you had the accuracy to put the id of the todo somewhere within the template
    todo.set('complete', true);
    // some code here to re-render the list
    // or remove the todo single view and re-render it
    // in the simplest for just redrawr everything
    this.el.html('');
    _.each(this.collection, function (todo) {
        this.el.append(templ({model: todo}));
    });
}

The code above would not have been so easy without Models and Collections and as you can see it does not relate in any way with the server.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detail! What I'm getting from the responses is that there's some flexibility in usage - but best practice is to use models when I need to work with the data outside of just DOM manipulation. –  Fluidbyte Oct 25 '12 at 18:57
    
Exactly my point! :) I wanted to add the answer because other answers were concentrating on server-side syncing, which is only one of the pros of using Models and Collections fully. –  Tallmaris Oct 25 '12 at 19:01

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