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There are two tables:

  • Clients (id, name)
  • Order (id, id_client, name), where id_client - foreign key.

Write a query that selects the identifier and name of the first table and the number of records in the second table, associated with them. The result should be sorted by surname in descending order.

I've tried

SELECT 
   Clients.id, Clients.name, count(id) 
FROM clients 
INNER JOIN Order ON Clients.id = Order.id_client 
GROUP BY 
   Clients.id, Clients.name 
ORDER BY 
   Clients.name DESC

But it doesn't work. What is wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
Define "it (sic) doesn't work" – LittleBobbyTables Oct 25 '12 at 13:08
3  
Two words: LEFT JOIN. More words: Order is a reserved word, and the alternative to LEFT JOIN is a scalar subquery in the SELECT. – RichardTheKiwi Oct 25 '12 at 13:09
2  
What do you mean by it doesn't work ?!?!? Do you get an error - if so: WHAT error? Do you just get no results at all? The "wrong" results? If so: WHY are they wrong - what did you expect instead? – marc_s Oct 25 '12 at 13:09
2  
@Guys can we not yell, he's got 1 rep point therefore he must be a new user. Show some courtesy. – JonH Oct 25 '12 at 13:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT
 c.ID,
 c.Name,
 COUNT(o.ID)
FROM
 Clients c
LEFT JOIN [Order] o
ON
 o.id_client = c.id
GROUP BY
 c.ID,
 c.Name
ORDER BY
 c.Name DESC
share|improve this answer
    
You missed an order by – RichardTheKiwi Oct 25 '12 at 13:13

SELECT Clients.id, Clients.name, count(client.id) FROM clients INNER JOIN Order on Clients.id=Order.id_client GROUP BY Clients.id, Clients.name ORDER BY Clients.name DESC

share|improve this answer

Change count(id) to

count(Clients.id) or count(Order.id)

I don't know which table you need count(id) from. I hope you understand where the issue is.

share|improve this answer
    
makes no difference in this case – be here now Oct 25 '12 at 13:11
SELECT
 c.ID,
 c.Name,
 COUNT(o.ID)
FROM
 Clients c,
 Order o
WHERE o.id_client = c.id
GROUP BY
 c.ID
 c.Name
share|improve this answer
1  
join syntax is more readable, this is the old way of performing a join behind the scenes. – JonH Oct 25 '12 at 13:18
    
Plus it also suffers from not bracketing the Order table name. – LittleBobbyTables Oct 25 '12 at 13:18

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