Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After reading about closures in JavaScript, I am still unable to understand where are they used? If there were no closures then how would the things be done alternately (if possible) and what does the use of closures simplify. If someone can explain this with some code examples in JavaScript it would be helpful. Any links to articles explaining this are also welcome. I have read this article mentioned in a similar question. It explains with code like this

    function makeSizer(size) {
      return function() {
        document.body.style.fontSize = size + 'px';
      };
    }

    var size12 = makeSizer(12);
    var size14 = makeSizer(14);
    var size16 = makeSizer(16);

document.getElementById('size-12').onclick = size12;
document.getElementById('size-14').onclick = size14;
document.getElementById('size-16').onclick = size16;

But why would I do like this when instead I can easily create a function like this

function sizer(size) {
            document.body.style.fontSize = size + 'px';
          };

    document.getElementById('size-12').onclick = function(){sizer(12)};
    document.getElementById('size-14').onclick = function(){sizer(14)};
    document.getElementById('size-16').onclick = function(){sizer(16)};
share|improve this question
    
They are used all over the place. It's just how the language works. There are no specific use cases. –  katspaugh Oct 25 '12 at 13:58
    
@Neerav: Never mind that all those onclicks are technically closures too. :) Truth is, JS almost wouldn't be worth using if functions couldn't be whipped up and passed around at will. We'd be back in the bad old days of passing a string of JS code to parse and run, or something like that. –  cHao Oct 25 '12 at 14:03
    
That is not a good example of where closures are needed. They're useful for creating new variable scope. –  zzzzBov Oct 25 '12 at 14:09

3 Answers 3

In your example, making makeSizer() return a function would mean less code.

function makeSizer(size) {
    return function() {
        document.body.style.fontSize = size + 'px';
    };
}

document.getElementById('size-12').onclick = makeSizer(12);
document.getElementById('size-14').onclick = makeSizer(14);
document.getElementById('size-16').onclick = makeSizer(16);

vs.

function sizer(size) {
    document.body.style.fontSize = size + 'px';
};

document.getElementById('size-12').onclick = function(){sizer(12)};
document.getElementById('size-14').onclick = function(){sizer(14)};
document.getElementById('size-16').onclick = function(){sizer(16)};
share|improve this answer

You can do multiple things with closures. Regarding to your question: The closure is used to set a up a partial function. This technique is used in functional programming when currying comes into the scene. Currying means that a function is invoked after each parameter passing and returning the result of it. Mostly a partial function, but when all params are passed it will return the final value. That very technique you just pretended to do by explicitely returning a new function.

Why is it useful? Well, its a functional programming technique, one you can compare with partial classes in object oriënted programming.

There are situations when this concept is useful. Read my blog on software-innovators.nl for an in-dept example.

Remember, this is one of more examples where closures are needed.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think this SO answer pretty much explain the concept in detail. After reading this my understanding is that closures are there to make functions as first class objects. Functions as first class objects are really helpful as they can be passed like arguments and make certain things quite easy.

Also one more benefit of using closures is probably they can be used to make members private in JavaScript as explained in this post.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.