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I'm attempting to generate new variables in a data frame that are conditional on two (or more) other variables in the data frame. I believe that the looping functions in R (i.e., lapply, sapply, etc.) are useful and efficient for this purpose. Something is not right, however, with my approach, and I can't figure out what.

M <- data.frame(x=c("A", "A", "B", "B"), y=c(1,2,1,2))

Using this data frame, I would like to generate a new column z, containing logicals that are TRUE iff both x == "A" and y == 1. The following code is the best I can come up with here, but only seems to evaluate my first condition.

M$z <- sapply(M$x, function(x,y) if((x == "A") && (y == 1)) T else F, M$y)
  • Can this code be fixed for my purpose?
  • Is there a better way of doing this in R, perhaps using other looping functions?
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a task for transform function

transform(M, z=ifelse((x == "A") & (y == 1), T, F))
  x y     z
1 A 1  TRUE
2 A 2 FALSE
3 B 1 FALSE
4 B 2 FALSE

I think an even simpler approach would be

M$z <- with(M, (x == "A") & (y == 1))
M
  x y     z
1 A 1  TRUE
2 A 2 FALSE
3 B 1 FALSE
4 B 2 FALSE
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That's a way more efficient way of solving the problem. @tfarkas Native vectorization is almost always better than using apply. Even simpler: M$z<-ifelse((x == "A") & (y == 1), T, F) –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 25 '12 at 13:58
1  
Why not just M$z <- M$x == "A" & M$y == 1? - Nevermind... your edit does essentially that. I just wasn't a fan of the whole ifelse(conditional, T, F) construct because you're just outputting what was in the conditional anyways. –  Dason Oct 25 '12 at 14:02
    
from efficient to positively minimalist! Thanks so much everyone. Why can't I accept any of these as answers? For the record, i like the ifelse() construct best, because it's computationally efficient, and general (so that it could output objects of any mode). Cheers! –  tfarkas Oct 25 '12 at 14:19
2  
@AriB.Friedman ifelse isn't really vectorised, any more than apply() et al are. It is iterating over the vector, but it is not the same as the truly vectorised operations using == and & as shown in the edit to this Answer. –  Gavin Simpson Oct 25 '12 at 14:22
1  
ifelse looks vectorized to me. It makes vectors of the yes and no outcomes and indexes them using the conditional, so it's not a fundamentally different approach. –  Fojtasek Oct 25 '12 at 15:08

Take a look at mapply:

> M$z <- mapply(M$x,M$y, FUN=function(x,y) if((x == "A") && (y == 1)) T else F)
> M
  x y     z
1 A 1  TRUE
2 A 2 FALSE
3 B 1 FALSE
4 B 2 FALSE

Apropos, this has nothing to do with anonymous functions and everything to do with applying with multiple arguments. If you named the function it would still not work in any of the single-argument apply variants.

The other way to do this would be to ddply by row, or split your data.frame into a list with each row being a separate entry.

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i thought all the looping functions had a "..." argument that passed extra arguments to the function? –  tfarkas Oct 25 '12 at 14:36
    
@tfarkas mapply does as well. Since I've passed an argument name for the function, that matches even though it's in the first position. Then everything else gets wrapped into .... –  Ari B. Friedman Oct 25 '12 at 14:38

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