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Okay. So I am currently trying to create a list of an interface in C# that takes an interface as a parameter. To make this clearer, let me give an example:

public interface IPlate<T> where T : IWaffle {}
public interface IWaffles {}

public class BelgiumWaffle : IWaffle {}
public class FalafelWaffle : IWaffle {}
public class HugePlate : IPlate<BelgiumWaffle> {}
public class SmallPlate : IPlate<FalafelWaffle> {}


// Now, I want to do the following:
var plates = new List<IPlate<IWaffle>>();
plates.add(new HugePlate());
plates.add(new SmallPlate());

The goal is to be able to serialize a list of IPlate objects into XML. I was hoping to use generics to do this but I keep getting errors telling me that there are some argument errors when trying to add (aka - the types don't match up). Just not sure what I'm doing wrong here. It seems right to me but I must be missing something (obviously).

Update: I should mention that this is .NET v3.5

Update: Sorry! Some typos when writing the question regarding definition of Plate classes.

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1  
Does IWaffle have any properties? Is it [Serializable]. What about Plate<W>? –  Glenn Ferrie Oct 25 '12 at 13:56
    
You don't have a definition for IPancake in your example. I assume you mean IWaffle? –  Bobson Oct 25 '12 at 13:56
    
Is the List<IPlate<IPancake>> supposed to be a List<IPlate<IWaffle>>? Also which .Net version? –  RobH Oct 25 '12 at 13:56
1  
This is not valid C# - please edit. 1) public class HugePlate<BelgiumWaffle>, 2) where did IPancake come from? –  Lawrence Wagerfield Oct 25 '12 at 13:58
4  
Hmm HugePlate and SmallPlate don't seem to implement IPlate...typo? –  Christian Oct 25 '12 at 13:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should use covariance (.NET 4.0)

public interface IPlate<out T> where T : IWaffle {}

and replace IPancake with IWaffle

var plates = new List<IPlate<IPancake>>();
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Sorry, mixing up examples from my code I was playing with (changed to IWaffles) –  John Oct 25 '12 at 13:59
2  
Ooh, I just learned something. Thanks! –  Bobson Oct 25 '12 at 14:00
    
That's really cool. Do you happen to know how to achieve the same thing with v3.5? Unfortunately, that is the version we are stuck with right now. –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:04
1  
Define a non-generic IPlate interface that will be a base for a generic one and use List<IPlate>. I don't think you can achieve more type safety in 3.5 –  Jakub Konecki Oct 25 '12 at 14:44

Neither HugePlate nor SmallPlate implement IPlate<IPancake> interface which is required by plates list.

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Sorry, mixup. Has been updated. (shouldn't this be a comment?) –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:00
    
@John I still see the HugePlate<BelgiumWaffle> (which is incorrect due BelgiumWaffle is a class name and there should be a variable name), and no IPlate<IWaffle> in that line (nor the next one). –  Protron Oct 25 '12 at 14:05
    
@Protron Why is HugePlate<BelgiumWaffle> incorrect? It compiles and runs for my tests? Also seems like proper use to me given HugePlate inherits from IPlate<T> where T : IWaffle and BelgiumWaffle is of IWaffle –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:13
    
@Protron and I should be using a variable name in my class declaration? Really?? –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:13
    
@John In your original declaration that part did not compile. The word BelgiumWaffle was in the generic part of the class name declaration. Now you move it to the generics part of the inheritance (which is ok). And by variable name I meant like the T in your IPlate declaration (if that is what your're asking). –  Protron Oct 25 '12 at 14:45

Besides covariance (as already pointed out by @JakubKonecki), your definitions for HugePlate and SmallPlate look incorrect, as they need to implement IPlate.

Try this:

public interface IPlate<out T> where T : IWaffle {}
public interface IWaffle {}

public class BelgiumWaffle : IWaffle {}
public class FalafelWaffle : IWaffle {}
public class HugePlate<T> : IPlate<T> where T : IWaffle {}
public class SmallPlate<T> : IPlate<T> where T : IWaffle {}
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Hey, you're right that I do have an error in the question (typo, Sorry!) and I have updated it. However, the class-definitions that I have (for my purposes) will need to go ahead and define T for it's implementation of IPlate. –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:16
    
So after that you just need to put out into definition of IPlate :) –  Roman Pekar Oct 25 '12 at 14:18
    
@John I wasn't nitpicking, I understand this is a contrived example just to show your issue... It's just that I didn't know what parts you just mistyped in your example and which were actual issues in your real code :) –  Paolo Falabella Oct 25 '12 at 14:20

Works in 3.5, thanks to @JakubKonecki who pointed about covariance

    public interface IWaffle { }
    public interface IPlate<out T> where T : IWaffle { }
    public interface IPancake : IWaffle { }

    public class BelgiumWaffle : IWaffle {}
    public class FalafelWaffle : IWaffle {}
    public class HugePlate : IPlate<BelgiumWaffle> {}
    public class SmallPlate : IPlate<FalafelWaffle> { }

    var plates = new List<IPlate<IWaffle>>();
    plates.Add(new HugePlate());
    plates.Add(new SmallPlate());
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I think that is working. In my real code though, I'm getting errors because I have defined a property in the interface that returns a List<T> and it's groaning about T being a variant type... hmm... –  John Oct 25 '12 at 14:21
    
Does not work in 3.5. The out keyword for covariance was added in the .NET Framework 4. –  Protron Oct 25 '12 at 14:40

Can you use an abstract class instead of a interface for T?

public abstract class Waffle { }
public interface IPlate<T> where T : Waffle
{
    T Food
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class BelgiumWaffle : Waffle { }
public class FalafelWaffle : Waffle { }
public class HugePlate<T> : IPlate<T> where T : Waffle
{
    public HugePlate(T food)
    {
        this.Food = food;
    }

    public T Food
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class SmallPlate<T> : IPlate<T> where T : Waffle
{
    public SmallPlate(T food)
    {
        this.Food = food;
    }

    public T Food
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class Test
{
    Test()
    {
        var platesOfWaffle = new List<IPlate<Waffle>>();
        platesOfWaffle.Add(new HugePlate<Waffle>(new BelgiumWaffle()));
        platesOfWaffle.Add(new SmallPlate<Waffle>(new FalafelWaffle()));
    }
}
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In the .NET Framework 3.5 you don't have the out parameter to use on generics covariance like in .NET Framework 4.0.

You could try to workaround it with a non-generic version of your IPlate (in this case I name it IPlateNG).

Consider the following example in .NET Framework 4.0 (I had to expand it to show my point):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public interface IWaffle { string Eat(); }
// on C# 4.0 you just put the "out" to mark the covariance (and that is it)
public interface IPlate<out T> where T : IWaffle { T GetMyWaffle(); }

public class BelgiumWaffle : IWaffle {
    public string Eat() { return "Eating a Belgium Waffle"; }
    public string Breakfast() { return "Breakfasting a Belgium Waffle"; }
}
public class FalafelWaffle : IWaffle {
    public string Eat() { return "Eating a Falafel Waffle"; }
    public string Dinner() { return "Having dinner with a Falafel Waffle"; }
}
public class HugePlate : IPlate<BelgiumWaffle> {
    public BelgiumWaffle GetMyWaffle() { return new BelgiumWaffle(); }
}
public class SmallPlate : IPlate<FalafelWaffle> {
    public FalafelWaffle GetMyWaffle() { return new FalafelWaffle(); }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var plates = new List<IPlate<IWaffle>>();
        plates.Add(new HugePlate());
        plates.Add(new SmallPlate());

        IPlate<IWaffle> aPlate = plates[0];
        // Anyway, when you get a member of the collection you'll get the interface, not a concrete class (obviously).
        IWaffle aWaffle = aPlate.GetMyWaffle();
        // So you cannot invoke any specifics (like Breakfast or Dinner)
        Console.WriteLine(aWaffle.Eat());

        // But if you cast the member of the collection to the specific class (or interface)
        IPlate<FalafelWaffle> aSmallPlate = (SmallPlate)plates[1];
        // Then you'll get the concrete class without casting again
        FalafelWaffle aFalafel = aSmallPlate.GetMyWaffle();
        Console.WriteLine(aFalafel.Dinner());
    }
}

Now this would be the same for the .NET Framework 3.5:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public interface IWaffle { string Eat(); }
// In this case I define this extra inteface which is non-generic
// And inside it, we need a new method equivalent to the one on the generic one
public interface IPlateNG { IWaffle GetWaffle(); }
// And make the generic one implement the non-generic one
public interface IPlate<T> : IPlateNG where T : IWaffle { T GetMyWaffle(); }

public class BelgiumWaffle : IWaffle {
    public string Eat() { return "Eating a Belgium Waffle"; }
    public string Breakfast() { return "Breakfasting a Belgium Waffle"; }
}
public class FalafelWaffle : IWaffle {
    public string Eat() { return "Eating a Falafel Waffle"; }
    public string Dinner() { return "Having dinner with a Falafel Waffle"; }
}
public class HugePlate : IPlate<BelgiumWaffle> {
    // This extra method is needed due the lack of the 'out' on the definition
    public IWaffle GetWaffle() { return GetMyWaffle(); }
    public BelgiumWaffle GetMyWaffle() { return new BelgiumWaffle(); }
}
public class SmallPlate : IPlate<FalafelWaffle> {
    // This extra method is needed due the lack of the 'out' on the definition
    public IWaffle GetWaffle() { return GetMyWaffle(); }
    public FalafelWaffle GetMyWaffle() { return new FalafelWaffle(); }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // The list cannot work with the IPlate<IWaffle> anymore. So here comes IPlateNG to the rescue
        var plates = new List<IPlateNG>();
        plates.Add(new HugePlate());
        plates.Add(new SmallPlate());

        IPlateNG aPlate = plates[0];
        // And instead of calling to the GetMyWaffle method we can call to the GetWaffle in this case
        IWaffle aWaffle = aPlate.GetWaffle();
        Console.WriteLine(aWaffle.Eat());

        IPlate<FalafelWaffle> aSmallPlate = (SmallPlate)plates[1];
        FalafelWaffle aFalafel = aSmallPlate.GetMyWaffle();
        Console.WriteLine(aFalafel.Dinner());
    }
}

Notice that I had to make an extra non-generic versions of the GetMyWaffle (named GetWaffle) on both IPlate concrete classes to workaround this lack of the "out" keyword. But the rest is pretty similar.

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