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I have a file that outputs lines of the following form:

$XYZ blah blah blah
$XYZ something
$XYZ random data

The "$XYZ" prefix is the same for every line, it really does start with a dollar sign, and it's highly unlikely to occur anywhere but the start of a line.

The only way I can get at this file is via screen capture, which causes the lines to wrap at 80 characters. So it looks like the following (if you pretend wrapping is at a smaller number than 80):

$XYZ blah bl
ah blah
$XYZ somethi
ng
$XYZ random 
data

I'd like to recreate the real lines from that. I could write a program to do it, but I'm thinking there might be some Unix command that I'm not familiar with that might make it easy. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
why a screencapture ? –  njzk2 Oct 25 '12 at 14:18
    
Crazy security permissions at various levels. I can do a cat, but I can't ftp it or cp it to somewhere I could ftp it from or anything else that I've been able to think of. –  user1738853 Oct 25 '12 at 14:24
    
if you're doing a cat in a terminal emulator, aren't the line breaks being inserted client-side, in which case you should be able to pipe the output locally somehow? –  lynks Oct 25 '12 at 14:32
    
can't you sftp or scp it (channeling it through ssh, that is) ? –  njzk2 Oct 25 '12 at 15:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, merge all the lines into one long line and then add a newline wherever you see the word which is supposed to be the start of a line, like this:

tr -d '\n' < file | sed 's/XYZ/\nXYZ/g'
share|improve this answer
    
i was about to answer with exactly this –  lynks Oct 25 '12 at 14:26
    
No, but maybe because I'm not doing the regexp correctly... I should have noted that "XYZ" actually begins with a dollar sign. –  user1738853 Oct 25 '12 at 14:29
    
use \$ to escape the dollar i.e. sed 's/\$XYZ/\n$XYZ/g' –  dogbane Oct 25 '12 at 14:30
    
@user1738853 Make sure you using single quotes with sed. Double quotes will cause the shell to interpret $XYZ as a variable. –  chrisaycock Oct 25 '12 at 14:32
    
OK, problem was not the regexp - I was doing that correctly - it was that the file that screencap made had CRLFs, not just LFs. Stripped the CRs out too, and your suggestion then worked perfectly. Thanks! –  user1738853 Oct 25 '12 at 14:36

In perl :

perl -pe 's/\n//g;s/XYZ\s+/\n$&/g' filename.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Version simplified. –  sputnick Oct 25 '12 at 14:30

The paste command is for exactly this purpose:

paste -d "" - -

As in

echo '$XYZ blah bl
ah blah
$XYZ somethi
ng
$XYZ random 
data' | paste -d "" - -

outputs

$XYZ blah blah blah
$XYZ something
$XYZ random data
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