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Just for my own education, what are some neat ways to convert some arrays so that each one is associated with the key of a hash, and all those hashes end up in an array?

To make things a bit clearer, assume I've got some arrays like these:

my @n = ( 1,    2,    3 );
my @f = ( 3.14, 1.21, 0.75 );
my @s = ( 'a',  'b',  'c' );

And I want an array of hashes looking like this:

my %h = ( number => 1, float => 3.14, string => 'a' );

Simple C-style iteration is an obvious solution:

for ( my $i = 0; $i < @n; $i++ ) {
    my %h = ();
    $h{number} = $n[$i];
    $h{float}  = $f[$i];
    $h{string} = $s[$i];
    push @a, \%h;
}

Slightly more Perlish:

for (0..$#n) {
    push @c, { number => $n[$_], float => $f[$_], string => $s[$_] };
}

Or if I want to be concise and don't care about destroying the arrays:

for (0..$#n) {
    push @a, { number => shift @n, float => shift @f, string => shift @s };
}

And with List::MoreUtils:

use List::MoreUtils qw (each_array);
my $it = each_array @n, @f, @s;
while ( my ($n, $f, $s) = $it->() ) {
    push @a, { number => $n, float => $f, string => $s };
}

So in the spirit of TMTOWTDI, what other solutions am I missing?

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4 Answers

Not really readable, using a slice:

@{ $d[$_] }{qw/number float string/} = ($n[$_], $f[$_], $s[$_]) for 0 .. $#n;
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my @array = map { number => $n[$_], float => $f[$_], string => $s[$_] }, 0 .. $#n;

I'm not a Perl guy, just a suggestion :)

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This program does what you require

use strict;
use warnings;

my @n = ( 1,    2,    3 );
my @f = ( 3.14, 1.21, 0.75 );
my @s = ( 'a',  'b',  'c' );

my @data;
for my $i (0 .. $#n) {
  @{$data[$i]}{ qw/ number float string / } = map $_->[$i], \(@n, @f, @s);
}

use Data::Dump;
dd \@data;

output

[
  { float => 3.14, number => 1, string => "a" },
  { float => 1.21, number => 2, string => "b" },
  { float => 0.75, number => 3, string => "c" },
]

Or you may prefer a solution using the List::MoreUtils library's each_array function. The output from this program is identical to that from my previous solution above.

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::MoreUtils 'each_array';

my @n = ( 1,    2,    3 );
my @f = ( 3.14, 1.21, 0.75 );
my @s = ( 'a',  'b',  'c' );

my $iter = each_array(@n, @f, @s);
my @data;
while ( my @values = $iter->() ) {
  my $i = $iter->('index');
  @{ $data[$i] }{ qw/ number float string / } = @values;
}

use Data::Dump;
dd \@data;
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This uses some utilities from List::MoreUtils

  • mesh to integrate a list of arrays
  • part to partition an array

Also _POSINT from Params::Util to tell whether or not next argument is a positive integer.

use List::MoreUtils qw<mesh part>; # integrate and partition arrays
use Params::Util    qw<_POSINT>;   # test number positive

# accept size number if positive int, otherwise we will be returning pairs. 
sub by (@) { 
   my $num = &_POSINT ? shift : 2;
   my $i   = -1;
   return part { int( ++$i / $num ) } @_;
}

my @n      = qw< 1    2    3 >;
my @f      = qw< 3.14 1.21 0.75 >;
my @s      = qw< a    b    c >;
my @fields = qw<number float string>;

my @results = map { +{ mesh @fields, @$_ } } by 3 => mesh @n, @f, @s;

Of course, using this, you could just list the data like so:

my @results 
    = map { +{ mesh @fields, @$_ } } 
      by 3 => qw< 1 3.14 a
                  2 1.21 b
                  3 0.75 c
                >
    ;

And skip the first mesh. The layout indicates the structure of the data (like the code does.)

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