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How can a Javascript object refer to values in itself?

I have some JS as follows:

var Wrap = {

    Inner : {

        site_base : "http://site.com/",
        marker_purple : site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png"
    }
}

site_base is undefined. Wrap.Inner.site_base is undefined.

How can I access my values within the same object?

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marked as duplicate by Alex K., jbabey, Bergi, Grant Thomas, Christoph Oct 25 '12 at 15:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You can't. You'd have to do that in a separate statement: Wrap.Inner.marker_purple = Wrap.Inner.site_base + ... –  Pointy Oct 25 '12 at 14:49
1  
Nope; stackoverflow.com/questions/2787245/… –  Alex K. Oct 25 '12 at 14:49
1  
Object literals do not define a scope, functions do for variables. –  Bergi Oct 25 '12 at 14:52
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6 Answers 6

The error you have is due to the fact that site_base is undefined, so object creation fails.

Try this:

var site_base = "http://site.com/";

var Wrap = {
    Inner : {
        site_base : site_base,
        marker_purple : site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png"
    }
}
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Happy with this approach - thank you. I'll accept as soon as I'm allowed. –  Alex Oct 25 '12 at 14:59
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Alternative to a separate statement:

var Wrap = { // variable names starting with capital letters make me uncomfortable
  Inner: function() {
    var base = "http://site.com/";
    return {
      site_base: base,
      marker_purple: base + "images/icon/marker-purple.png"
    };
  }()
};
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Use a closure within an Immediately Invoked Function Expression:

var Wrap = (function(){
  var site_base = "http://site.com/"
  return {
      Inner: {marker_purple : site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png"}
  };
}());
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You have to do it in different statements as the object does not exist yet.

var Wrap = {
    Inner:{
        site_base: "http://site.com/"
    }
};
Wrap.Inner.marker_purple = Wrap.Inner.site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png"
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I know what you mean, but "on different lines" doesn't sit well with me. Although it probably should, given the auto statement termination nature of JavaScript engines in general. –  Grant Thomas Oct 25 '12 at 14:50
    
Good point, I updated it. –  ferrants Oct 25 '12 at 15:02
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As already stated in the other answers, you can not access object properties, before the object is actually created. Thus your code fails.

When using ECMAScript 5 and the Object.create() function, however, you can mimic the behavior you want by using the get() function like this:

var Wrap ={
  Inner: Object.create(Object.prototype, {

    site_base: { writable:true, configurable:true, value: "http://site.com/" },

    marker_purple: {
      get: function() { return this.site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png" }
    }
  })
};

More information can be found on MDN, e.g. on browser support

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Is it valid?

marker_purple : this.site_base + "images/icon/marker-puple.png"  

EDIT: I can test it and it works fine btw.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Jon B Oct 25 '12 at 15:21
    
No, it isn't valid. Don't post wild guesses as answers when you can easily test them. –  interjay Oct 25 '12 at 15:23
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